Publicizing Fluoroquinolone Warnings

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I have such mixed feelings about the FDA’s response to the November, 2015 Antimicrobial Drugs Advisory Committee meeting regarding fluoroquinolone safety. On one hand, I feel like they really did hear those who testified, and they not only listened, they responded in a way that showed that they listened. The FDA did what the Antimicrobial Drugs Advisory Committee recommended they do: they updated fluoroquinolone warnings to note that, “the serious side effects associated with fluoroquinolone antibacterial drugs generally outweigh the benefits for patients with acute sinusitis, acute bronchitis, and uncomplicated urinary tract infections who have other treatment options.” They not only updated the warning labels, they updated the black-box warnings–the most severe warning a drug can have. I am truly grateful for the steps forward in acknowledging fluoroquinolone adverse-reactions, and I’m hopeful that the updated warning labels will lead physicians and patients to realize that fluoroquinolones are dangerous drugs with potentially devastating consequences.

I wonder though, what good is an updated warning label? In the post, Who Reads the Drug Warning Labels? I go over the problem of people not knowing what is on the warning labels. Are physicians going to read the updated warning labels? Are patients? Is anyone other than the “floxie” community going to realize that the warning labels have been changed?

I appreciate the action taken by the FDA–I really do–but are updated warning labels actually going to change anything? Will fewer people get injured and killed by fluoroquinolones? I certainly hope that a significant portion of doctors hear about the warning label changes, and stop prescribing fluoroquinolones, but, unfortunately, the FDA isn’t taking any major steps to make this happen.

The FDA has no plans to inform individual doctors about the recent warning label changes made to fluoroquinolone warning labels. Even though the black-box warnings, again–the most severe warning label a drug can receive, have been updated to note that fluoroquinolones are associated with disabling and potentially irreversible serious adverse reactions, the FDA is not going to tell doctors about the changes. No “dear doctor” letter will be issued by the FDA. They will not do a massive publicity campaign to let physicians or patients know that the warning labels have been updated. They know about the dangers of fluoroquinolones, and, in their own way, they acknowledge them, but they’re not proactively communicating what they know to patients or physicians.

Since the FDA isn’t going to issue a “dear doctor” letter, it will likely be helpful if we (the people in the fluoroquinolone toxicity community, and those who care about drug safety) give the information the FDA has released to our doctors, local hospitals, and media.

I encourage everyone reading this to please, please, please send this information (that is directly from the FDA) to your doctors, the media, your friends, your loved ones, and anyone else who you think may benefit from the information. People need to know how dangerous Cipro/ciprofloxacin, Levaquin/levofloxacin, Avelox/moxifloxacin, and Factive/gemifloxacin are. In order for them to know how dangerous these drugs are, we need to tell them.

Please forward these FDA releases to those who need this information:

  1. 5/12/16 – Fluoroquinolone Antibacterial Drugs: Drug Safety Communication – FDA Advises Restricting Use for Certain Uncomplicated Infections
  2. 7/26/16 – FDA Drug Safety Communication: FDA updates warnings for oral and injectable fluoroquinolone antibiotics due to disabling side effects
  3. July, 2016 Drug Safety Labeling Changes

Since most people don’t actually click on links, I’m also going to copy and paste what the FDA notices said (feel free to share this post with anyone who needs the information too).

Fluoroquinolone Antibacterial Drugs: Drug Safety Communication – FDA Advises Restricting Use for Certain Uncomplicated Infections:

AUDIENCE: Internal Medicine, Family Practice, Pharmacy, Patient

ISSUE: FDA is advising that the serious side effects associated with fluoroquinolone antibacterial drugs generally outweigh the benefits for patients with acute sinusitis, acute bronchitis, and uncomplicated urinary tract infections who have other treatment options. For patients with these conditions, fluoroquinolones should be reserved for those who do not have alternative treatment options.

An FDA safety review has shown that fluoroquinolones when used systemically (i.e. tablets, capsules, and injectable) are associated with disabling and potentially permanent serious side effects that can occur together. These side effects can involve the tendons, muscles, joints, nerves, and central nervous system.

As a result, FDA is requiring the drug labels and Medication Guides for all fluoroquinolone antibacterial drugs to be updated to reflect this new safety information. FDA is continuing to investigate safety issues with fluoroquinolones and will update the public with additional information if it becomes available.

See the FDA Drug Safety Communication for a list of currently available FDA approved fluoroquinolones for systemic use.

BACKGROUND: The safety issues described in the Drug Safety Communication were also discussed at an FDA Advisory Committee meeting in November 2015.

RECOMMENDATION: Patients should contact your health care professional immediately if you experience any serious side effects while taking your fluoroquinolone medicine. Some signs and symptoms of serious side effects include tendon, joint and muscle pain, a “pins and needles” tingling or pricking sensation, confusion, and hallucinations. Patients should talk with your health care professional if you have any questions or concerns.

Health care professionals should stop systemic fluoroquinolone treatment immediately if a patient reports serious side effects, and switch to a non-fluoroquinolone antibacterial drug to complete the patient’s treatment course.

Healthcare professionals and patients are encouraged to report adverse events or side effects related to the use of these products to the FDA’s MedWatch Safety Information and Adverse Event Reporting Program:

  • Complete and submit the report Online: www.fda.gov/MedWatch/report

  • Download form or call 1-800-332-1088 to request a reporting form, then complete and return to the address on the pre-addressed form, or submit by fax to 1-800-FDA-0178

FDA Drug Safety Communication: FDA updates warnings for oral and injectable fluoroquinolone antibiotics due to disabling side effects:

SAFETY ANNOUNCEMENT

The U.S. Food and Drug Administration (FDA) approved changes to the labels of fluoroquinolone antibacterial drugs for systemic use (i.e., taken by mouth or by injection). These medicines are associated with disabling and potentially permanent side effects of the tendons, muscles, joints, nerves, and central nervous system that can occur together in the same patient. As a result, we revised the Boxed Warning, FDA’s strongest warning, to address these serious safety issues. We also added a new warning and updated other parts of the drug label, including the patient Medication Guide.

We have determined that fluoroquinolones should be reserved for use in patients who have no other treatment options for acute bacterial sinusitis, (ABS), acute bacterial exacerbation of chronic bronchitis (ABECB), and uncomplicated urinary tract infections (UTI) because the risk of these serious side effects generally outweighs the benefits in these patients. For some serious bacterial infections the benefits of fluoroquinolones outweigh the risks, and it is appropriate for them to remain available as a therapeutic option.

Patients must contact your health care professional immediately if you experience any serious side effects while taking your fluoroquinolone medicine. Some signs and symptoms of serious side effects include unusual joint or tendon pain, muscle weakness, a “pins and needles” tingling or pricking sensation, numbness in the arms or legs, confusion, and hallucinations. Talk with your health care professional if you have any questions or concerns (see List of Serious Side Effects from Fluoroquinolones).

Health care professionals should not prescribe systemic fluoroquinolones to patients who have other treatment options for acute bacterial sinusitis (ABS), acute bacterial exacerbation of chronic bronchitis (ABECB), and uncomplicated urinary tract infections (UTI) because the risks outweigh the benefits in these patients. Stop fluoroquinolone treatment immediately if a patient reports serious side effects, and switch to a non-fluoroquinolone antibacterial drug to complete the patient’s treatment course (see List of Currently Available FDA-approved Fluoroquinolones for Systemic Use).

Fluoroquinolones are antibiotic medicines that work by killing or stopping the growth of bacteria that can cause illness. They are FDA-approved to prevent or treat certain serious bacterial infections.

The labels of fluoroquinolone medicines already have a Boxed Warning for tendinitis, tendon rupture, and worsening of myasthenia gravis. The labels also include warnings about the risks of peripheral neuropathy and central nervous system effects. Other serious risks associated with fluoroquinolones are described in the labels, such as cardiac, dermatologic, and hypersensitivity reactions. After FDA’s 2013 review that led to the additional warning that peripheral neuropathy may be irreversible, FDA evaluated post-marketing reports* of apparently healthy patients who experienced disabling and potentially permanent side effects involving two or more body systems after being treated with a systemic fluoroquinolone (see Data Summary). We evaluated only reports submitted to FDA, so there are likely additional cases of which we are unaware. The side effects occurred within hours to weeks after starting the fluoroquinolone, and at the time we received the reports, the side effects had continued for an average of 14 months to as long as 9 years after stopping the medicines. Several cases reported that some side effects stopped or improved after discontinuation of the medicine; others reported the side effects worsened or continued.

We previously communicated about these safety issues associated with fluoroquinolones in May 2016. Additional communications about related safety issues associated with fluoroquinolones occurred in August 2013 (peripheral neuropathy) and July 2008 (tendinitis and tendon rupture). The safety issues described in this Drug Safety Communication were also discussed at an FDA Advisory Committee meeting in November 2015.

In addition to updating information in the Boxed Warning, we are also including information about these safety issues in the Warnings and Precautions section of the label. The Indications and Usage section contains new limitation-of-use statements to reserve fluoroquinolones for patients who do not have other available treatment options for acute bacterial sinusitis (ABS), acute bacterial exacerbation of chronic bronchitis (ABECB), and uncomplicated urinary tract infections (UTI). The patient Medication Guide that is required to be given to the patient with each fluoroquinolone prescription describes the safety issues associated with these medicines. We are continuing to assess safety issues with fluoroquinolones as part of FDA’s usual ongoing review of drugs and will update the public if additional actions are needed.

We urge health care professionals and patients to report side effects involving fluoroquinolone antibacterials and other drugs to the FDA MedWatch program, using the information in the “Contact FDA” box at the bottom of the page.

ADDITIONAL INFORMATION FOR PATIENTS

  • Fluoroquinolone antibiotic medicines are associated with disabling and potentially permanent serious side effects that can occur together in the same patient and should not be used to treat certain uncomplicated infections. These uncomplicated infections include acute bacterial sinusitis (ABS), acute worsening of bacterial chronic bronchitis (ABECB), and uncomplicated urinary tract infections (UTI).
  • These side effects can involve the tendons, muscles, joints, nerves, and central nervous system, and can occur within hours to weeks after starting a fluoroquinolone medicine.
  • FDA has updated the Boxed Warning in the labels, added new warnings, and has revised the patient Medication Guide of all fluoroquinolone antibiotics.
  • Contact your health care professional immediately if you experience any serious side effects while you are taking your fluoroquinolone medicine.
  • Before starting a new fluoroquinolone medicine, inform your health care professional if you have previously experienced any serious side effects with another antibiotic.
  • Serious side effects involving the tendons, muscles, joints and nerves include:
    • Swelling or inflammation of the tendons
    • Tendon rupture
    • Tingling or pricking sensation (“pins and needles”)
    • Numbness in arms or legs
    • Muscle pain
    • Joint pain
    • Joint swelling
  • Serious central nervous system side effects include:
    • Depression
    • Hallucinations
    • Suicidal thoughts
    • Confusion
    • Anxiety
  • Other side effects include:
    • Abnormally rapid or irregular heart beat
    • Ringing or buzzing in the ears
    • Vision problems
    • Skin rash
    • Sensitivity of skin to sunlight
    • Headache
    • Trouble falling asleep
    • Fatigue
  • Read the patient Medication Guide you receive with your fluoroquinolone antibiotic prescriptions, which explains the benefits and risks of the medicine.
  • Talk to your health care professional if you have questions or concerns about fluoroquinolone antibiotic medicines.
  • We communicated safety information associated with fluoroquinolones in May 2016, August 2013, andJuly 2008.
  • Report side effects from a fluoroquinolone or any drug to your health care professional and the FDA MedWatch program, using the information in the “Contact FDA” box at the bottom of this page.

ADDITIONAL INFORMATION FOR HEALTH CARE PROFESSIONALS

  • FDA has approved label changes that reserve the use of fluoroquinolone antibacterial medicines when treating acute bacterial sinusitis (ABS), acute bacterial exacerbation of chronic bronchitis (ABECB), and uncomplicated urinary tract infections (UTI) for patients who do not have alternative treatment options.

  • FDA has also updated the Boxed Warning and the Warnings and Precautions sections of the labels and revised the patient Medication Guide of the fluoroquinolone drug class to describe the serious risk of multiple disabling and potentially irreversible adverse reactions that can occur together.

  • These adverse reactions primarily include tendinitis and tendon rupture, muscle pain, muscle weakness, joint pain, joint swelling, peripheral neuropathy, and central nervous system effects.

  • The adverse reactions can occur within hours to weeks after starting treatment with a fluoroquinolone medicine.

  • Discontinue the fluoroquinolone medicine immediately at the first signs or symptoms of any serious adverse reaction.

  • Avoid fluoroquinolones in patients who have previously experienced serious adverse reactions associated with fluoroquinolones.

  • Serious Adverse reactions of the musculoskeletal system and peripheral nervous system include:

    • Tendinitis/Tendon rupture

    • Muscle pain

    • Muscle weakness

    • Joint pain

    • Joint swelling

    • Peripheral Neuropathy

    • Serious Central nervous system effects include:

      • Psychosis
      • Anxiety
      •  Insomnia
      • Depression
      • Hallucinations
      • Suicidal thoughts
      • Confusion
    • Other adverse reactions include:

      • Exacerbation of myasthenia gravis
      • Prolongation of the QT interval
      • Hypersensitivity reactions/anaphylaxis
      • Photosensitivity/phototoxicity
      • Blood glucose disturbances
      • Clostridium difficile-associated diarrhea
    • Encourage patients to read the Medication Guide that they receive with their fluoroquinolone prescriptions.

    • FDA convened a public advisory committee meeting in November 2015 to discuss the risks and benefits of fluoroquinolone antibacterial medicines for the treatment of ABS, ABECB, and uncomplicated UTI. We also communicated safety information associated with fluoroquinolones in May 2016, August 2013, and July 2008.

    • Report adverse reactions involving a fluoroquinolone or any drug to the FDA MedWatch program, using the information in the “Contact FDA” box at the bottom of this page.

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Levaquin/levofloxacin Warning Label Changes (Please see July, 2016 Drug Safety Labeling Changes for the other fluoroquinolone label changes:

BOX WARNING (revised)

WARNING: SERIOUS ADVERSE REACTIONS INCLUDING TENDINITIS, TENDON RUPTURE, PERIPHERAL NEUROPATHY, CENTRAL NERVOUS SYSTEM EFFECTS AND EXACERBATION OF MYASTHENIA GRAVIS

  • Fluoroquinolones, including LEVAQUIN®, have been associated with disabling and potentially irreversible serious adverse reactions that have occurred together including:
    • Tendinitis and tendon rupture
    • Peripheral neuropathy
    • Central nervous system effects
  • Discontinue LEVAQUIN immediately and avoid the use of fluoroquinolones, including LEVAQUIN, in patients who experience any of these serious adverse reactions. Fluoroquinolones, including LEVAQUIN, may exacerbate muscle weakness in patients with myasthenia gravis. Avoid LEVAQUIN in patients with known history of myasthenia gravis.
  • Because fluoroquinolones, including LEVAQUIN, have been associated with serious adverse reactions, reserve LEVAQUIN for use in patients who have no alternative treatment options for the following indications:
    • Acute exacerbation of chronic bronchitis
    • Acute uncomplicated cystitis
    • Acute sinusitis

WARNINGS AND PRECAUTIONS

Disabling and Potentially Irreversible Serious Adverse Reactions Including Tendinitis and Tendon Rupture, Peripheral Neuropathy, and Central Nervous System Effects (addition)
  • Fluoroquinolones, including LEVAQUIN, have been associated with disabling and potentially irreversible serious adverse reactions from different body systems that can occur together in the same patient. Commonly seen adverse reactions include tendinitis, tendon rupture, arthralgia, myalgia, peripheral neuropathy, and central nervous system effects (hallucinations, anxiety, depression, insomnia, severe headaches, and confusion). These reactions can occur within hours to weeks after starting LEVAQUIN. Patients of any age or without pre-existing risk factors have experienced these adverse reactions.
  • Discontinue LEVAQUIN immediately at the first signs or symptoms of any serious adverse reaction. In addition, avoid the use of fluoroquinolones, including LEVAQUIN, in patients who have experienced any of these serious adverse reactions associated with fluoroquinolones.
Tendinitis and Tendon Rupture replaces Tendinopathy
  • Fluoroquinolones, including LEVAQUIN, have been associated with an increased risk of tendinitis and tendon rupture in all ages. This adverse reaction most frequently involves the Achilles tendon, and has also been reported with the rotator cuff (the shoulder), the hand, the biceps, the thumb, and other tendons. Tendinitis or tendon rupture can occur, within hours or days of starting LEVAQUIN, or as long as several months after completion of fluoroquinolone therapy… Tendinitis and tendon rupture can occur bilaterally.
  • The risk of developing fluoroquinolone-associated tendinitis and tendon rupture is increased in patients over 60 years of age, in patients taking corticosteroid drugs, and in patients with kidney, heart or lung transplants. Other factors that may independently increase the risk of tendon rupture include strenuous physical activity, renal failure, and previous tendon disorders such as rheumatoid arthritis. Tendinitis and tendon rupture have also occurred in patients taking fluoroquinolones who do not have the above risk factors. Discontinue LEVAQUIN immediately if the patient experiences pain, swelling, inflammation or rupture of a tendon. Avoid fluoroquinolones, including LEVAQUIN, in patients who have a history of tendon disorders or have experienced tendinitis or tendon rupture.
Peripheral Neuropathy (new sentences added)
  • Fluoroquinolones, including LEVAQUIN, have been associated with an increased risk of peripheral neuropathy. Cases of sensory…
  • …minimize the development of an irreversible condition…Avoid fluoroquinolones, including LEVAQUIN, in patients who have previously experienced peripheral neuropathy.

ADVERSE REACTIONS

  • The following serious and otherwise important adverse drug reactions are discussed in greater detail in other sections of labeling:
    • Disabling and Potentially Irreversible Serious Adverse Reactions (addition)
    • Tendinitis and Tendon Rupture (replaces Tendon Effects)

PATIENT COUNSELING INFORMATION

Serious Adverse Reactions
  • Advise patients to stop taking LEVAQUIN if they experience an adverse reaction and to call their healthcare provider for advice on completing the full course of treatment with another antibacterial drug. Inform patients of the following serious adverse reactions that have been associated with LEVAQUIN or other fluoroquinolone use:
  • Disabling and potentially irreversible serious adverse reactions that may occur together: Inform patients that disabling and potentially irreversible serious adverse reactions, including tendinitis and tendon rupture, peripheral neuropathies, and central nervous system effects, have been associated with use of LEVAQUIN and may occur together in the same patient. Inform patients to stop taking LEVAQUIN immediately if they experience an adverse reaction and to call their healthcare provider. (addition)
  • Tendinitis and tendon rupture replaces Tendon Disorders

MEDICATION GUIDE

What is the most important information I should know about LEVAQUIN?

Tendon rupture or swelling of the tendon (tendinitis).

  • Stop taking LEVAQUIN immediately and get medical help right away…
  • Worsening of myasthenia gravis (a problem that causes muscle weakness). Tell your healthcare provider if you have a history of myasthenia gravis before you start taking LEVAQUIN. (addition)

What is LEVAQUIN?

  • LEVAQUIN should not be used in patients with acute exacerbation of chronic bronchitis, acute uncomplicated cystitis, and sinus infections, if there are other treatment options available.
  • LEVAQUIN should not be used as the first choice of antibacterial medicine to treat lower respiratory tract infections cause by a certain type of bacterial called Streptococcus pneumoniae.

Before you take LEVAQUIN, tell your healthcare provider if you:

  • have a disease that causes muscle weakness (myasthenia gravis); LEVAQUIN should not be used in patients who have a known history of myasthenia gravis.
  • have nerve problems; LEVAQUIN should not be used in patients who have a history of a nerve problem called peripheral neuropathy

How should I take LEVAQUIN?

Do not skip any doses of LEVAQUIN, or stop taking it, even if you begin to feel better, until you finish your prescribed treatment unless:

  • you have nerve problems. See “What is the most important information I should know about LEVAQUIN?”

  • you have central nervous system problems. See “What is the most important information I should know about LEVAQUIN?”

     

All help in spreading the word about these FDA warnings will be greatly appreciated!

 

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17 thoughts on “Publicizing Fluoroquinolone Warnings

  1. Tracy Whiteside August 22, 2016 at 7:13 am Reply

    Shouldn’t we be tweeting every day, about MArgaret Hamburgs indictment, that, Hitler like, mass murdering monster, needs tone exposed, has everyone googled, and, read about both of her parents being former Presidents of the Eugenics society, MArgaret Hamburg,
    Bill Weldon, and, Alex Gorsky, belong in prison, monsters.

    • Lisa August 22, 2016 at 7:16 am Reply

      Getting media attention for the lawsuit against Margaret Hamburg is also appreciated! Please share those news stories with anyone who will listen as well! The revolving door between pharma and the FDA needs to be stopped.

  2. tammyrenzi August 22, 2016 at 7:13 am Reply

    Thank you, Lisa. I think it’s so important for us all to know that they will not be making a big announcement to physicians. We can all keep spreading the word so others do not suffer like we did.

    • Lisa August 22, 2016 at 7:17 am Reply

      Indeed. We have come a long way, and a lot more people know about fluoroquinolone toxicity now than did when we first got hurt by FQs, but the job is not done, and not everyone knows about the dangers of these drugs. We’ll keep screaming until meaningful change occurs, and/or until fluoroquinolone toxicity is common knowledge.

  3. Sherry Reiver August 22, 2016 at 8:42 am Reply

    Lisa, thank you for listening to my thoughts about the FDA warnings snd writing about it! I appreciate it. Maybe you can add in somewhere that they are unnecessarily used for many other reasons other than what the FDA warned about. People need to know NOT to use them prophylactically during surgeries or when their dentists and urologists use them for the “just in case you get an infection ” scenerio!

    Good work Lisa!

    • Sherry Reiver August 22, 2016 at 8:43 am Reply

      Excuse typos!

  4. L August 22, 2016 at 9:18 am Reply

    well stated! I know for a fact of a couple people being injured from cipro AFTER these warnings the doctors are still clueless.

  5. L August 22, 2016 at 9:19 am Reply

    and might I add…the FDA is SUPPOSED to protect us. They are severely derelict in their duty by NOT warning doctors. But then it is my belief that they do only just enough to placate the angry crowd and still protect their real client, big pharma.

  6. jan554 August 22, 2016 at 12:56 pm Reply

    Hi Lisa, I forwarded this to a friend of mine who is an investigative reporter at Fox News. I requested she both have them do an investigative piece and present it on their Sunday House call show

    If she need someone to speak on it for a show are you willing?

    Thanks,

    Jan Shields aka “Nurse Jan”

    Sent from my iPhone

    >

    • Sherry Reiver August 23, 2016 at 3:59 am Reply

      Hi Nurse Jan,

      I hope that your friend has good connections as I have been in touch with Dr. Samadi for a few years now writing to him every chance I get about the FQs and their dangers. A few weeks ago they mentioned Cipro and Levaquin for use. I cringed.

  7. Debs August 22, 2016 at 1:59 pm Reply

    Well I for one was not expecting anything much different, remember the first black box warning & what happened there ?. The FDA have not updated these warnings out of the goodness of their heart of course, instead they have been forced into making this public knowledge by us. Whether individuals they listened or not to us, ( & thank you from the bottom of my soul for those who went to the meeting & testified ), the fact that half the funding of the federal death agency FDA comes from Big Pharma, that & the revolving door aspect etc between them dictated exactly how this news is going to be distributed . Big Pharma have a very big influence here, & they do NOT want this getting out. The FDA is to a large extent completely under Big Pharmas’ control, so they ARE only going to do the bare minimum they can get away with here, ( just as they have always done ), they are certainly NOT going to be proactive in getting this news out to the Drs themselves, or even want this news getting out to our Drs ‘ in the field ‘. They will fight tooth & nail to keep Drs in the dark as much possible, for as long as possible, in ANY way possible.

    We need to ask ourselves this : WHY would they, the big Pharma FDA collusion, NOT send a Dear Dr letter out for something SO VERY serious as potentially permanent irreversible Iatrogenic injury ?, yet so much other far less serious stuff they are so very hot on .

    My answer to this is that at the top, those psychopaths in charge of that investment business with disease where the buck stops, THEY DO NOT CARE about the countless patients that they harm. First responsibility is always to the shareholders, & they must make as much profit as possible for these people, we the patients who get hurt along the way, we are simply nuisance value, collateral damage. There are many more of us out there right now completely unaware of the serious dangers of these failed chemo drugs, & that of course is exactly how they want it to stay.

    The FQs are SO important to Big Pharma, & for MANY reasons, including for one the fact they have future plans re that Quinoline nucleus. Re their ignoring of the mitochondrial toxicity, if they ARE forced to acknowledge the mitochondrial toxicity, & research subsequently reveals where a big part of the problem lies re our ADRs ( suspected to be related to that defective Quinoline nucleus ), WHAT then will happen to those future plans, ? to the new Quinolones /FQs / hybrids / in the pipeline ?, the various other Quinoline drugs ? etc .
    They know exactly how these drugs cause the injuries they do, & they do NOT want others digging that deep & finding out.

    The longer that they can delay this becoming common knowledge, the better for the shareholders, as the more people they poison, the more people they can trap in the FQ world & prescribe more poisons to to treat the symptoms for. The more conditions mimicked by FQ toxicity, ‘ severe mental illnesses ‘ misdiagnosed, that they can get Drs to prescribe no end of various drugs, including multiple psychotropic drugs for, & the more they they can get Drs to misdiagnose FQ induced secondary versions of autoimmune conditions, prescribe drugs for etc, let alone prescribe them for the real conditions which may arise courtesy of FQ use, BEFORE this whole thing eventually blows sky high, the more profit for these people they make.

    To learn the full history of those involved in this crime against humanity from the beginning, & see exactly how it all fits together is something I recommended everyone research.

    I feel that the ONLY way that this is going to get out to our Drs, is for us to work together to try to get this out ourselves, every which way we can, & bugger the fact that we maybe feel it should not have to be us that have to do this.
    There are precious lives at stake here, every single minute of every single day, including our poor defenceless vulnerable people, our babies, our children, those who have their whole lives before them, those who have not even HAD a life yet, those who cannot even advocate for themselves, & the thought of our poor little ones growing up potentially living , ( no existing ) their whole lives in the severity of excruciating pain I am in, let alone the rest of the crap that comes along with being floxed , this just fills me with sheer unadulterated horror, it makes me feel physically sick.

    I don’t actually live in the USA, I live elsewhere, where our own Drug regulatory agency will not even listen to us re this updated FDA warning. Ours is heavily funded & influenced by the pharmaceutical industry, so no surprise there either.
    As our own Drs, & also many pharmacists here are literally still in the stone age re the FQs , I have been printing the warning out myself & handing it out to pharmacies, handing it out & telling everyone I can think of, who has ANY connection to, ANY association with the medical profession in any way shape or form at all. And from those I have personally handed the warning out to to so far , I have only received grateful thanks & appreciation.

    As that well known saying : ‘If you want a job done properly, then you have to do it yourself ‘ goes, I feel that now could not be a more appropriate time to put that particular saying into practice.

  8. Debs August 22, 2016 at 2:10 pm Reply

  9. Debs August 22, 2016 at 2:14 pm Reply

    For the bigger picture . https://youtu.be/ySnk-f2ThpE

  10. Barbara Arnold August 23, 2016 at 5:59 am Reply

    Hey Debs,

    Great posts.
    I have just made up three packs for three Rheumatologists at my local hospital. The first page is in massive capital letters that say….YOU ARE NEGLIGENT IN YOUR DUTY OF CARE AND HERE IS THE EVIDENCE TO PROVE IT.
    Then it contains the Dear Doctor letter, then my post of “First do no harm” Then Tons of copies of research that proves the damage fluroquinolones do and also includes the latest FDA’ s warning.
    Not that these arrogant no all’s will do anything about it, but it makes me feel better. Also it’s spreading the word. Aparently they “love quinolones” and they dish them out like sweets.

    The packs were triggered by this knowledge also the last Rheumatologist I saw last week suggested that I might have a nerve disease grrrrr, this was after I explained EVERYTHING to her. She then tried to pass me on to a Neurologist even though I told her
    the last nerve test I had caused a MASSIVE PAINFUL flare up. I really don’t know how my husband contained himself as he was furious and frustrated by her ignorance.
    It did not effect me as much as my husband as I have come to expect to be treated like an idiot.
    I only went to see her as I thought there might be the slightest chance I could get IV’s of glutathione on the same health service that poisoned me. No chance…..it’s not on their list hah.
    We really do need to keep plugging away at this apalling attitude, and so little respect for people’s suffering. I for one will not stop trying to spread the word.

    On a lighter note I have just started ozone autohemotherapy. I have high hopes and will post after I’ve had 4 or 5 sessions to let you all know how I go on. Fingers crossed.
    Hugs to all,
    Barbara

  11. Marie - Sweden September 1, 2016 at 12:54 pm Reply

    I get free newsletters in English from the French organisation – Prescrire. I just got the September-issue and they are writing about drugs that may cause different tendon problems such as for instance fluoroquinolones, cortisone and statins.
    You will find the article on http://www.prescrire.org.
    Are there any books – apart from Bitter Pills (Stephen Fried) that you would recommend?

    • L September 1, 2016 at 1:07 pm Reply

      I would recommend Dr Jay Cohen’s :How We Can Halt The Cipro and Levaquin Catastrophe: The Worst Medication Disaster in U.S. History.” You can purchase online. (The title really says it all, doesn’t it?)

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