A Fluoroquinolone Toxicity Post Goes Viral

A post about fluoroquinolone toxicity, i.e. getting “floxed,” i.e. getting “ruined” by Cipro, has gone viral.

Check it out!

This antibiotic will ruin you.

It has been shared more than 10,000 times on Facebook (probably closer to 20,000 – the web site stops updating each share after 10,000 shares) – including more than 6,000 shares from The Fluoroquinolone Wall of Pain Facebook page.

It is resonating with thousands of people, who are not only reading it, they are sharing it. It has been viewed by MILLIONS of people. The author, Amy, posted on her facebook page that, in just a couple days, the post has been viewed more than 4 million times. That’s amazing!

Please shareThis antibiotic will ruin you with your friends and family. It’s getting through to people. It’s informing people. It’s connecting people.

Thank you, Amy, for sharing your journey and your story, and for doing it in a way that has resonated with so many people!

This post has done more to get the word out about the dangers of fluoroquinolone antibiotics (Cipro/ciprofloxacin, Levaquin/levofloxacin, Avelox/moxifloxacin, Floxin/ofloxacin, and a few others) than 90% of the other posts, media stories, etc. that have been produced. It has gone viral. It has gone so viral that people are writing about it going viral, including WOMAN SAYS FLOUROQUINOLONES ANTIBIOTICS ‘WILL RUIN YOU,’ GETS 40K FACEBOOK LIKES on Inquistr.com (which, I believe is part of Buzzfeed), and, obviously, this post.

Viral posts aren’t something that happens every day, so, CONGRATULATIONS, Amy! Most importantly, her viral post, This antibiotic will ruin you, is increasing awareness about fluoroquinolone toxicity.

This antibiotic will ruin you has more than 1,000 comments on it – many of which are from fellow “floxies.” Amy has stated (on facebook) that she wants to respond to all of them, but that she’s drowning in the volume of comments. Can you, my friends in the “floxie” community, who are experts in fluoroquinolone toxicity, please help her? Please take some time to respond to some of the people who have commented on This antibiotic will ruin you. Your help will be appreciated!

The viral nature of the post has given us a window of opportunity to inform people about fluoroquinolone toxicity, and to support those who are going through it who didn’t realize that there is a support network available. Any help that you can provide in further spreading the post, and helping to answer comments on the post, will help. Thank you!

 

 

EMA to review persistence of side effects known to occur with quinolone and fluoroquinolone antibiotics

I hope I’m not too late in posting this. The following notice was published by the European Medicines Agency (EMA) in February, 2017 (and I’m posting it in March). I want to encourage all of my European “floxie” friends to contact the EMA to report your reaction, and to inquire about testifying. Even if testifying isn’t a possibility, we should all pay attention to what the EMA’s Pharmacovigilance Risk Assessment Committee (PRAC) decides.

The contact person listed on the EMA notice is:

Monika Benstetter
Tel. +44 (0)20 3660 8427
E-mail: press@ema.europa.eu

HOWEVER, the EMA has given us the contact information for the UK representatives of PRAC (the EMA’s Pharmacovigilance Risk Assessment Committee). Please contact them instead. They are:

julie.williams@mhra.gsi.gov.uk
and
patrick.batty@mhra.gsi.gov.uk

European floxie friends, please reach out to Ms. Benstetter to share your story, or to find out who you should share your story with. The patient testimony at the FDA hearing was moving, powerful, and I believe that it made a difference. Hopefully patient testimony will be allowed by the EMA, and it will make a difference too.

Here is the EMA announcement:

EMA to review persistence of side effects known to occur with quinolone and fluoroquinolone antibiotics: Review to focus on long-lasting effects mainly affecting musculoskeletal and nervous systems

The European Medicines Agency (EMA) is reviewing systemic and inhaled quinolone and fluoroquinolone antibiotics to evaluate the persistence of serious side effects mainly affecting muscles, joints and the nervous system. These side effects are of particular importance when the medicines are used for less severe infections.

The review is at the request of the German medicines authority (BfArM) following reports of longlasting side effects in the national safety database and the published literature. There has been no previous EU-wide review specifically focusing on the persistence of the side effects, but the side effects themselves are known and covered in the EU prescribing information for these medicines.

EMA’s Pharmacovigilance Risk Assessment Committee (PRAC) will now evaluate all available data and determine whether there is a need to introduce new measures to minimise these risks or modify how the medicines are used.

Quinolones and fluoroquinolones are widely prescribed in the EU and are important options for treating serious, life-threatening bacterial infections. Healthcare professionals using these medicines should continue to follow the official prescribing information.

Patients who have any questions about their treatment should speak to their doctor.

More about the medicines

Quinolones and fluoroquinolones are a class of broad spectrum antibiotics that are active against so-called Gram-negative and Gram-positive bacteria.

The review covers the following medicines: cinoxacin, ciprofloxacin, enoxacin, flumequine, levofloxacin, lomefloxacin, moxifloxacin, nalidixic acid, norfloxacin, ofloxacin, pefloxacin, pipemidic acid, prulifloxacin and rufloxacin.

More about the procedure

The review of quinolone and fluoroquinolone antibiotics was initiated on 9 February 2017 at the request of German medicines authority (BfArM), under Article 31 of Directive 2001/83/EC.

The review will be carried out by the Pharmacovigilance Risk Assessment Committee (PRAC), the Committee responsible for the evaluation of safety issues for human medicines, which will issue recommendations. The PRAC recommendations will then be sent to the Committee for Medicinal Products for Human Use (CHMP), responsible for questions concerning medicines for human use, which will adopt the Agency’s opinion. The final stage of the review procedure is the adoption by the European Commission of a legally binding decision applicable in all EU Member States.

I hope that the EMA’s Pharmacovigilance Risk Assessment Committee (PRAC) decides to acknowledge the serious adverse reactions caused by fluoroquinolones, and that they restrict the use of fluoroquinolones in Europe.

European friends, if you hear of anything that you can do to push the EMA’s PRAC to to decide to restrict fluoroquinolone use in Europe, please let me know. I’ll update this post if I hear anything new. Thank you!

 

 

 

 

Floxie Hope Podcast Episode 20 – Renee

Renee shares her journey through fluoroquinolone toxicity on Episode 20 of The Floxie Hope Podcast. Please check it out:

http://www.floxiehopepodcast.com/episode-020-renee/

https://itunes.apple.com/us/podcast/floxie-hope-podcast/id945226010

Renee’s written story of her journey through fluoroquinolone toxicity can be found here – https://floxiehope.com/renees-story-cipro-reaction/

Renee had taken fluoroquiolones in the past with no notable adverse reaction. This time though, after taking ONE PILL, the flox BOMB went off in her body and she experienced many devastating symptoms of fluoroquinolone toxicity.

Some keys to her recovery included The Wahls Protocol diet, support from loved ones, and a hopeful, positive attitude.

Thank you so much for sharing your journey, Renee! You are amazing, wise, and greatly appreciated!

 

Happy Birthday Grandma!

grandma

Today is my Grandma’s birthday. Happy birthday, Gram! I hope you have a wonderful day!

My Grandma is one of my favorite people in the world and I love her very much.

My Grandma was incredibly, wonderfully supportive through my journey through fluoroquinolone toxicity. As soon as I said, “I’m sick,” before I even knew why or how I was sick, she took me seriously. When I realized what was making me sick, she never questioned me. She never downplayed or dismissed my experience with fluoroquinolone toxicity–she just believed me. She was always on my side, and it didn’t seem like it ever occurred to her to believe the medical establishment, or anyone else, over me.

When she broke her hip a few years after I got floxed, my Grandma immediately put Cipro on her list of medications that she was not to be given. She knew that it was dangerous because of what I had gone through, and she didn’t want what happened to me to happen to her. Her refusal to take Cipro meant a lot to me. It signified that she believed me, and that she didn’t believe that my reaction was something rare or dismissible. It meant that she listened. I write about my experience with fluoroquinolone toxicity not to relive what happened, or to wallow in it, but to warn people so that they don’t go through the same thing I did. It means a lot when people listen, and it meant a lot to me that my Grandma listened to me, and that she refused to take the drug that hurt me. I’ve never had to fight with a doctor about a fluoroquinolone prescription for a loved one, but, I’m pretty sure that if I did get into an argument with a doctor about whether or not a fluoroquinolone prescription was appropriate for my Grandma, she would take my side.

I am lucky in that I have a lot of wonderfully supportive people in my life. I always felt like everyone in my family loved me and wanted what was best for me. I have always known that I am loved and cherished. I have always known that all of my loved ones were on my side. They are all appreciated!

Not all “floxies” have supportive loved ones. Some people don’t believe that their floxed loved one is really sick. Some people don’t try to understand what their floxed loved one is going through. Some people have family members who are dismissive of fluoroquinolone toxicity, and who don’t believe that it’s “real.” Some people have family members who believe that fluoroquinolones can’t be dangerous, and that adverse reactions can’t be devastating, even though there is plenty of documented evidence that fluoroquinolones ARE dangerous and adverse reactions ARE devastating. It saddens me when I hear of people who are not supported by their loved ones as they go through the difficulty of fluoroquinolone toxicity.

I appreciate the support of all my family members, and, today, on my Grandma’s birthday, I am especially appreciative of her.

You are loved, Gram. Happy Birthday! xoxo

 

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Dominick Cruz’s Cipro-Induced Tendon Rupture

Dominick Cruz, two-time UFC Bantamweight Champion, was floxed by Cipro. He describes his experience in episode #921 of Joe Rogan’s podcast, The Joe Rogan Experience.

Starting around minute 53 in the video above (and 1:02 in the downloaded podcast), Dominick Cruz states:

I did research later, I’m now basically a doctor to figure all this stuff out because of all the injuries I’ve been through. But 3 weeks before I fought Mizugaki I had a staph infection on my right thumb that popped up. So I took an antibiotic called Cipro. Now, me trusting the doctors and me not – it’s my own fault, not the doctors fault – I should have read the hazards of the antibiotic. But you kind of trust the doctors and assume, why would he give me something bad, right? Well, Cipro has an after-effect for six months after you ingest it that it weakens your tendons, so it makes them soft like real putty. And so I took it three weeks before the fight – that made it about 2 months after I ingested the Cipro – I was throwing a left high kick – I’d never had a problem with my right knee ever in my entire life, and it just popped throwing a high kick. I pivot on my right leg, throwing my left leg high, and it just popped and I knew right away, obviously, ’cause I’ve done it twice, that I’d blown it out. I remember literally, blowing it out, sitting on the floor, and the guy that I was drilling with was like, “What’s up?” and I was like, “I just blew my knee out.” He’s like, “What? Nothing happened!” It was crazy. It was a weird feeling. What was even weirder was the peace I had sitting there – not even caring. I literally was just – I remember blowing it out and sitting on the ring like, I told Eric, “Come here – You ready for another 9-month ACL reconstructive surgery?” and he’s like, “What? What are you talking about? Your knee’s fine.” I’m like, “No, I blew it out just now.” He’s like, “no you didn’t.” I said, “yes, I did.” And, that was it. So, I start again. I started the rehab again.

The good news for Dominick Cruz, and the hopeful take-away for all of us who have been hurt by fluoroquinolone antibiotics, is that after he went through surgery to reconstruct his blown-out ACL, and after 9 months of rest along with physical therapy, he returned to fighting and won the UFC Bantamweight Championship in January, 2016. Being able to fight in the UFC after experiencing a Cipro-induced tendon injury is huge, and we should all be inspired by Dominick Cruz’s comeback.

I have never talked to Dominick Cruz, nor have I heard anything about his story other than what he shared in episode 921 of The Joe Rogan Experience, so, what follows involves some conjecture. With that disclaimer noted, here are some thoughts about Dominick Cruz’s experience.

Why did Dominic Cruz’s doctor give a professional UFC fighter, an elite athlete, a fluoroquinolone prescription???? What is wrong with his doctor? Is his doctor not aware that tendon ruptures are a well-documented effect of fluoroquinolone antibiotics? He or she should be. It’s on the black box warning label for Cipro, and all other fluoroquinolones. The first sentence of the black-box warning for Cipro, in 2016, stated, “Fluoroquinolones, including CIPRO®, are associated with an increased risk of tendinitis and tendon rupture in all ages.” Did Dominick Cruz’s doctor think that healthy and strong tendons weren’t necessary for Dominick Cruz to do his job as a UFC fighter? Did Dominick Cruz’s doctor think that it was okay for him to experience tendinitis and tendon ruptures? Maybe Dominick Cruz’s doctor is under the impression that UFC fighters don’t need healthy, strong, flexible, and durable tendons. It absolutely blows my mind that an ignorant fool of a doctor could give a UFC fighter, an elite athlete, and a man with a history of tendon injuries, a drug that has the documented effect of destroying tendons. It is unacceptable for a doctor to prescribe Cipro, a drug that has been shown to cause disabling tendon injuries in thousands of people, and which permanently alter the structure of rat tendons and causes permanent lameness in beagle puppies, as well as permanent disability in humans, to a man whose entire livelihood depends on his ability to use his tendons. That doctor is a dangerous ignoramus, and he should be fired then sued for every penny he’s got.

Every doctor who works with athletes, especially professional athletes, should read the article “Musculoskeletal Complications of Fluoroquinolones: Guidelines and Precautions for Usage in the
Athletic Population” where the first guideline for use  of fluoroquinolones in the athletic population is: “Athletes should avoid all use of fluoroquinolone antibiotics unless no alternative is available.” DON’T PRESCRIBE ATHLETES FLUOROQUINOLONES. It’s not that hard. In Dominick Cruz’s case, he was prescribed Cipro for a staph infection. There are a dozen other antibiotics that treat staph infections, and, according to this list, fluoroquinolones aren’t even the recommended treatment for staph infections. So why was Dominick Cruz given an antibiotic that has the effect of permanently weakening tendons and causing tendon ruptures? What an ignorant, foolish, awful doctor.

Even if the doctor who prescribed Cipro to Cruz wasn’t aware of the recommendations in “Musculoskeletal Complications of Fluoroquinolones: Guidelines and Precautions for Usage in the
Athletic Population,” he or she should have at least been aware of the black-box warning on Cipro which states, in the first sentence, “Fluoroquinolones, including CIPRO®, are associated with an increased risk of tendinitis and tendon rupture in all ages.” It’s inexcusable for a doctor not to know about the black-box warnings on the drugs that they prescribe. And, assuming that he isn’t ignorant of the black-box warning, why is he prescribing a tendon-destroying drug to an athlete like Dominick Cruz??

In the podcast, it sounds like Dominick Cruz isn’t angry with the doctor who prescribed Cipro. He states, “it’s my own fault, not the doctors fault – I should have read the hazards of the antibiotic.” He’s obviously more generous than I am. Though generosity, even generosity toward those who hurt you, is a virtue, I don’t think he’s right. According to the Learned Intermediary Doctrine, pharmaceutical manufacturers have no obligation to inform the consumer/patient about the dangers of drugs. Dominick Cruz, as the consumer/patient, wasn’t even supposed to be told about the dangers of Cipro. However, his doctor, the “learned intermediary,” WAS supposed to know about the dangers of Cipro. His doctor should have known that it isn’t appropriate to prescribe a tendon-destroying drug to a UFC athlete, and he should have known that there are safer alternative antibiotics that treat staph infections. His doctor should have known better, and his doctor should be held responsible for making such a terrible prescribing decision.

As much as I respect how Dominick Cruz has come to terms with his injuries and found peace and surrender that helped him to recover (described throughout the video/podcast), fighting is what he does for a living, and I’m a little disappointed to hear that he’s not interested in fighting the system that poisoned him and destroyed his tendons. It is not his fault that his tendons were weakened by Cipro (and maybe other fluoroquinolones). It is the fault of the pharmaceutical companies that produce these dangerous drugs and the doctors that prescribe them inappropriately and flippantly. He shouldn’t have been prescribed Cipro for various reasons (staph should be treated with other antibiotics, he has a history of tendon injuries, and he’s an athlete) and the people who endangered him by giving him these drugs should be held accountable. Dominick Cruz probably has the clout to actually fight the people who poisoned him (unlike most of us, who struggle to gain justice for various reasons), and I hope that he does.

The tendon rupture that Dominick Cruz attributed to Cipro was his third tendon rupture, and earlier in the podcast you can listen to him describe his other tendon injuries (both of which he attributes to getting hurt while fighting, not weakened tendons from Cipro or any other fluoroquinolone). I wonder if he had taken Cipro, Levaquin, Avelox, Floxin, or one of the generic fluoroquinolones prior to his other tendon injuries. He thinks that the effects of fluoroquinolones on tendons only last six months, but, unfortunately, he’s wrong. Fluoroquinolone antibiotics can permanently alter the structure and strength of tendons. If he had taken a fluoroquinolone prior to his other tendon injuries, maybe they’re due to the drugs too, and he just hasn’t connected those injuries to the antibiotics. (Or, it’s entirely possible that those injuries were from fighting and training as he asserts.) A young, fit, well-conditioned, athlete like Cruz shouldn’t have weak, easily injured, tendons though. For his tendons to be so prone to injury, something is going on – maybe his tendons were weakened and changed by Cipro, Levaquin, Avelox, Floxin, or generic fluoroquinolones.

Since Dominick Cruz won back, and defended, his Bantamweight Champion title, it’s tempting to assert that he has fully recovered from his tendon injuries. However, if you listen to the whole podcast/video, Cruz goes on to describe how he now has debilitating plantar fasciitis. His tendons are messed up. His fascia is messed up. I certainly hope that he recovers from the plantar fasciitis, and I hope that he never has another tendon injury again. But I’m betting that he’ll battle tendon and fascia injuries for a while, and that the musculoskeletal destruction caused by fluoroquinolones will end his UFC fighting career. I hope I’m wrong about that.

Another thing that Dominick Cruz mentions in the podcast/video is that the UFC is in constant contact with injured fighters’ doctors. Why is the UFC allowing their fighters to be prescribed fluoroquinolone antibiotics???? Seriously, these drugs are dangerous, they can cause permanent disability, and there is a black box warning on them that notes that they can increase the risk of tendinitis and tendon ruptures. What is the UFC thinking allowing their fighters, the people who make them money, to be prescribed drugs that can injure, disable, and even kill them? There are hundreds of articles about the dangers of fluoroquinolones RIGHT HERE. They’re not difficult to access. It’s not difficult to see that fluoroquinolones are more dangerous than other antibiotics, especially to athletes who need to have properly-functioning tendons in order to do their job. Yet, the UFC is standing by, watching, while doctors prescribe tendon-destroying drugs to UFC stars–making them miss fights and costing both the athletes and the UFC massive amounts of money. It’s absurd. The UFC has the clout to stop this, and to tell their athletes, and the doctors that work with them, that fluoroquinolones shouldn’t be used on UFC athletes unless there are no viable alternatives. The adverse effects of fluoroquinolones are too severe, and the risk of injury after taking fluoroquinolones is too high, for UFC athletes to be taking these dangerous drugs.

I’m willing to bet that infections are rampant within the UFC, and that there are a lot of “floxed” UFC athletes. Open wounds occur often, mats and other equipment may be cleaned as well as possible, but they’re probably still swimming with nasty bacteria. It’s an environment with a lot of person-to-person contact, sweat, blood, and, inevitably, infections. If Dominick Cruz’s doctor threw Cipro at him to treat a staph infection, I bet the UFC doctors generally throw fluoroquinolones (Cipro, Levaquin, Avelox, Floxin, and their generic equivalents) at the UFC fighters whenever they get an infection. Fluoroquinolones are powerful, broad-spectrum, antibiotics. They’ll kill the bacteria. They’ll also ruin the tendons of the athlete, and cause disability in those who are unlucky.

Strong, athletic, young, capable, people can get hurt by fluoroquinolones. People like Dominick Cruz, who are at the peak of their fitness and athletic career, can experience weakened tendons, tanked testosterone, and worse, after taking fluoroquinolones. If the UFC thinks that their fighters are too strong to get hurt by these dangerous chemotherapeutic concoctions that destroy mitochondrial DNA, well, they’re wrong–and the athletes/fighters who are taking these drugs are being victimized by the willful ignorance of the doctors who prescribe these dangerous drugs.

I hope that all athletic organizations, coaches, sponsors, and athletes get together and put pressure on doctors to stop prescribing fluoroquinolone antibiotics to athletes. The dangerous and disabling effects of fluoroquinolones are well-documented, and there is no reason to prescribe them to athletes when there are other viable alternative antibiotics. Ruining an athlete’s career with a dangerous drug, when there are safer alternatives, is unacceptable. I hope that more people will wake up to the dangers of fluoroquinolones, and that fewer people generally, and specifically fewer athletes, are hurt by these drugs in the future.

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Fluoroquinolone Warning Labels to be Updated in Canada

Health Canada, the department of the government of Canada with responsibility for national public health (like the U.S. Food and Drug Administration) has “carried out a review of the potential risk of persistent and disabling side effects linked to the use of fluoroquinolones. The review was triggered by a benefit and safety review done by the United States Food and Drug Administration (FDA) on systemic (taken by mouth or by injection) fluoroquinolone drugs.”

The Canadian Review of fluoroquinolones concluded that (SOURCE):

  • Health Canada’s review concluded that some of the known side effects, specifically tendonitis/tendinopathy, peripheral neuropathy and central nervous system disorders, already linked to the use of fluoroquinolones, may be persistent and/or disabling. Given the high use of fluoroquinolones in Canada and the information reviewed, these side effects are considered rare.
  • Health Canada recommended that the safety information for all fluoroquinolone products be updated to include information about this rare but serious risk. Health Canada is working with manufacturers to update the safety information of all systemic (taken by mouth or by injection) fluoroquinolone products marketed in Canada. In addition, an Information Update and a Health Care Professional Letter will be published and distributed to further inform Canadians and healthcare professionals about this risk.
  • Health Canada is working with the Drug Safety and Effectiveness Network (DSEN) and the Canadian Agency for Drugs and Technologies in Health (CADTH) to conduct additional studies to better understand the use of fluoroquinolones in Canada.
  • On October 6, 2016, Health Canada brought together a Scientific Advisory Panel on Anti-Infective Therapies to discuss the risks associated with the use of fluoroquinolones. The panel recommended that the safety information for fluoroquinolones be updated, and risk communications be published and distributed to further inform Canadians and healthcare professionals about the potential risk that some of the known side effects, specifically tendonitis/tendinopathy, peripheral neuropathy and central nervous system disorders may be persistent and/or disabling.
  • Health Canada will continue to monitor safety information involving fluoroquinolones, as it does for all health products on the Canadian market, to identify and assess potential harms. Health Canada will take appropriate and timely action if and when any new health risks are identified.

As a result of its safety review, Health Canada is working on updating fluoroquinolone warning labels.

Additionally, above and beyond what the U.S. F.D.A. has done, Health Canada has agreed to publish and distribute a Healthcare Professional Letter regarding fluoroquinolone risks. The Healthcare Professional Letter includes the following points:

  • It is recommended that the potential for disabling and persistent serious adverse events be considered when choosing to prescribe a fluoroquinolone.
  • Fluoroquinolones should not be prescribed to patients who have experienced serious adverse reactions during or after prior treatments.
  • Healthcare professionals are advised to stop systemic fluoroquinolone treatment if a patient reports a serious adverse reaction. The patient’s treatment should be switched to an alternative treatment with a non-fluoroquinolone antibacterial drug if needed to complete the treatment course.
  • Healthcare professionals should be aware that some adverse reactions associated with the use of fluoroquinolones can occur within hours to weeks after exposure to the treatment.

This acknowledgement from Health Canada that fluoroquinolones may have permanent and/or disabling effects is a huge step in the right direction for Canadian “floxies.”

All Canadians who have experienced adverse reactions to fluoroquinolones are encouraged to report their reactions to Health Canada through the Canada Vigilance Adverse Reaction Online Database.

This acknowledgement from Health Canada is a huge step in the direction of safety and informed consent for all Canadians. It is appreciated!

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Consumer Reports Warns Patients About Fluoroquinolone Dangers

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Consumer Reports has published several articles about the dangers of fluoroquinolone antibiotics (including Cipro/ciprofloxacin, Levaquin/levofloxacin, Avelox/moxifloxacin, Floxin/ofloxacin, and a few others). Their help in getting the word out to their readers about the risks associated with fluoroquinolone antibiotics is greatly appreciated!

The picture above, from the August, 2016 print issue of Consumer Reports, states:

These potent antibiotics are often prescribed to treat bronchitis, sinus infections, and urinary tract infections. But drugs such as ciprofloxacin (Cipro), levofloxacin (Levaquin), and ofloxacin (Floxin) can cause irregular heartbeats, depression, nerve damage, ruptured tendons, seizures, and other serious side effects. The Food and Drug Administration issued an alert in May saying that fluoroquinolones should not be used to treat bronchitis, sinus infections, and UTIs, unless other options have not worked.

Avoid Problems. If your doctor suggests a fluoroquinolone, ask why. For sinus infections, you might need an antibiotic if your symptoms last more than a week or if you have a high fever, but the first option should be amoxicillin. For a UTI, fluoroquinolones are only necessary if the infection is resistant to other antibiotics or has spread to your kidneys. And they are necessary for chronic bronchitis only if you require hospitalization.

In Fluoroquinolones Are Too Risky for Common Infections: The FDA advises restricting use of popular antibiotics such as Cipro due to dangerous side effects, Consumer Reports notes that the FDA “is advising against prescribing fluoroquinolones, a group of antibiotics that includes drugs such as Cipro and Levaquin, to treat three common illnesses —bronchitis, sinus infections, and urinary tract infections.” The article also quotes Rachel Brummert, the Executive Director of the Quinolone Vigilance Foundation, and notes that her injuries from Levaquin include tendon ruptures and progressive nerve damage. The article also gives a guide of when to say no to fluoroquinolones. It’s an excellent article–please share it far and wide.

In Make Sure Your Doctor Prescribes the Right Antibiotic: There are safer, better options than fluoroquinolones and other frequently prescribed broad-spectrum drugs, the severe effects of fluoroquinolones are noted:

“For example, fluoroquinolone antibiotics such as ciprofloxacin (Cipro and generic) and levofloxacin (Levaquin and generic)—which are frequently prescribed inappropriately for sinus infections in adults—can cause permanent and debilitating damage to muscles, tendons, and nerves.”

As the title of the article says, there are safer, better options than fluoroquinolones (in many situations).

In Surprising Remedy for Deadly Hospital Infections: New study suggests doctors cut back on antibiotics. Here’s what you need to know. it is noted that fluoroquinolone use can lead to c. diff infections:

“Research published in The Lancet, a British medical journal, shows that when doctors in U.K. hospitals cut back on prescribing Cipro, Levaquin, and other so-called fluoroquinolone antibiotics, the rate of deadly infections from the bacteria known as C. diff dropped a whopping 80 percent.”

Fluoroquinolones wipe out the good bacteria that keep c. diff bacteria suppressed. When those good bacteria are eliminated, c. diff infections can take over. C. diff infections can be deadly, and all healthcare professionals should take note of this (somewhat counterintuitive) study.

All of the articles linked to above also note that fluoroquinolone over-use is contributing to antibiotic resistance.

In Meds That Cause Blurred Vision, Hearing Loss, and More: Painkillers, antibiotics, and other common drugs can trigger surprising side effects Cipro is listed as a drug that can cause double vision.

In I Didn’t Know That Antibiotics Shouldn’t Always be Used to Treat Bronchitis, Mary H. describes how Levaquin (prescribed to treat bronchitis) led to Stevens-Johnson Syndrome, which can be deadly.

All of these Consumer Reports articles are greatly appreciated, and I encourage you to read them, comment on them (where possible), and share them with your loved ones.

Consumer Reports has been a trusted source of information, and a strong advocate for consumer protection, since its founding in 1936. The articles linked-to above are from a highly respected source that is trusted by millions of people. It is a credible publication.

For a trusted and credible publication like Consumer Reports to be publishing information about the severe and varied health maladies that are associated with flouroquinolones is a huge step in the right direction. Their acknowledgement of the FDA’s updated warnings on fluoroquinolones, as well as the testimony of patients who have been hurt by fluoroquinolones, is appreciated immensely.

Thank you, Consumer Reports! Please keep it up, and hopefully other trusted news and consumer advocacy publications will follow suit.

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