Tag Archives: Flox

The Term “Flox”

When I tell people about this site they often ask me what the terms flox, floxed, and floxie mean. I am not a lexicographer by any stretch, and these are not official definitions, but here are my answers:

Flox (noun): A shorthand term for the multi-symptom, chronic illnesses brought on by fluoroquinolone antibiotics that are referred to as Fluoroquinolone toxicity or Fluoroquinolone Associated Disability (FQAD).

Flox (verb): To be afflicted with fluoroquinolone toxicity or FQAD. The term “flox” is typically used in the past tense as “floxed,” as in, “I was floxed by cipro in 2011.”

Floxie (noun): A person who suffers from fluoroquinolone toxicity or FQAD.

The term “flox” comes from the names of the fluroquinolone antibiotics. All the fluoroquinolones contain “flox” in their names – ciproFLOXacin, levoFLOXacin, moxiFLOXacin, gatiFLOXacin, oFLOXacin, etc. As communities of victims of these drugs formed, people found it easier to say, “I’ve been floxed” or, “I’m a floxie” than to say, “I am going though a multi-symptom illness brought on by fluoroquinolone antibiotics.” Perhaps the term “FQAD” would have been just as easy to say as “flox,” but “flox” preceded “FQAD” by more than a decade and the term has stuck.

The earliest written record of the term “flox” that I can find is in Stephen Fried’s 1998 bestselling book, “Bitter Pills: Inside the Hazardous World of Legal Drugs.” In it, Fried describes his wife’s severe, primarily psychiatric, adverse reaction to ofloxacin, a fluoroquinolone antibiotic. Fried noted that the community of people who had been hurt by this class of drugs referred to themselves as “floxies” and spoke of their condition as being “floxed.” (EDIT/NOTE – Please see Mr. Fried’s comment below for correct information about the early usage of the term “flox.)

Most journal, and even news, articles don’t use the terms “flox” or “floxie.” They typically refer to the constellation of symptoms that “floxies” deal with as “adverse reactions to fluoroquinolone antibiotics” or they don’t refer to the syndrome as a whole at all, rather, they’ll list the symptoms that their featured victim suffers from, and then note that the victim attributes those symptoms to fluoroquinolone antibiotics. A couple news articles have used the term FQAD, as it was coined by the FDA, and is seen as a bit more official than “flox.”

In online communities new terms are often coined, and they gain traction in those communities. “Flox” is one of those terms. The terms “flox” and “floxie” are primarily used on the internet in support groups for victims of fluoroquinolones. The biggest Facebook group for victims of fluoroquinolones is The Fluoroquinolone Toxicity Group, and their url is https://www.facebook.com/groups/floxies/ (note the “floxies” in the url – it’s easier than https://www.facebook.com/groups/FluoroquinoloneToxicityGroup). Additionally, this site is one of the more popular blogs about fluoroquinolones, and it’s called Floxie Hope. The terms “flox” and “floxie” are used throughout blogs and support groups dedicated to fluoroquinolone toxicity.

People within the “floxie” groups and communities know these terms and what they mean and imply. The people in the “floxie” community know when someone says that they are “severely floxed” that it means that person is suffering from more symptoms than they can count or name and that they are likely bed or house bound as a result of their fluoroquinolone-induced injuries. Of course, everyone’s experience is different, and people are encouraged in these communities to further describe their pain and their experience, but it’s far easier to say, “I’m severely floxed” than it is to list dozens of symptoms then say that those symptoms were caused by fluoroquinolone antibiotics.

Some people really hate the terms “flox” and they particularly hate the term “floxie.” They see the terms as silly and flippant, and they see it as disrespectful to those who are suffering from fluoroquinolone toxicity. Fluoroquinolone toxicity IS a serious and severe illness, and it should be taken seriously by doctors, patients, regulators, and everyone else. It is not a joke, or something to be taken lightly. It is a life-altering, often disabling, syndrome. Fluoroquinolones have maimed and killed people, and fluoroquinolone toxicity should be taken as seriously as other multi-symptom, chronic, mysterious illnesses like M.S., Lupus, Lyme Disease, M.E./CFS, etc.

Neither “flox” nor “floxie” are particularly serious terms, and I empathize, and even agree with, those who see it as minimizing the seriousness and severity of fluoroquinolone toxicity.

But… sometimes terms just stick. Both flox and floxie are terms that have resonated with people in the community, and they have stuck. Many people find it easier to describe their illness as being “floxed” than to describe it any other way. It resonates with people more to say, “floxies unite!” than it does to say, “victims of fluoroquinolone antibiotics come together!” For the purposes that the the terms are used, they work well for expressing what people want and need to say. I don’t think that anyone who uses the terms “flox” or “floxie” mean any disrespect to the illness or the people suffering from it. In fact, most of the people using the terms are either victims of fluoroquinolones or those who love a victim of fluoroquinolones.

I am writing this post on a site called Floxie Hope, so I am, of course, somewhat biased. I like the term “floxie” and it has become part of my brand (if you can say that a blog has a brand). I think that the term sticks in people’s minds and it resonates with them. There is an understanding of what it means–at least within our community. The naming of this site was somewhat accidental–I was trying to figure out how to create a web site and this was supposed to be my place-holder site until I figured out the mechanics of blogging, then I was supposed to think of a more well thought out name for the official site, but then this site got rolling while named Floxie Hope, and 5.5 years later, it’s still going and here we are.

I hear the people who think that “flox” and “floxie” aren’t serious enough terms to connote the severity of fluoroquinolone toxicity. In a lot of ways, I think they’re right. BUT, I don’t think that the term has held this community back. We have made a lot of progress over the last decade. We still have a lot of work to do, but millions of people have become aware of fluoroquinolone toxicity and fluoroquinolone dangers over the last decade, and part of the momentum of this community is our shared language and our shared understanding of terms like “flox.”

The terms “flox” and “floxie” are ingrained in our community, and they are likely here to stay as long as fluoroquinolones are hurting people (I hope for the extinction of the term through the strict limiting of the drugs – but we’re a long way from that and it’s certainly a matter for another post). I think that the terms are doing more good (through ease of communication, bringing people together, and having terms that resonate with many) than harm.

I am hopeful that the terms “flox” and “floxie” will someday be so well understood and accepted that they make it into the dictionary. The only criteria for words making it into the dictionary is that they appear in edited text, so I actually hope that more journalists start using the terms “flox” and “floxie” in their articles. Having the terms “flox” and “floxie” in the dictionary would be wonderfully validating, and it would help to increase awareness of fluoroquinolone toxicity.

When I describe this site, I often try to tell the back-story and give the long explanation of how I was hurt by ciprofloxacin. Sometimes the person who I’m talking to says something like, “Oh, you’ve been floxed – that happened to my sister-in-law.” The word is getting out, and the terms “flox” and “floxie” are spreading. It’s a good thing. Awareness is one of the most important steps toward change, and short, easy-to-remember terms like “flox” and “floxie” help people to become aware of the dangers of fluoroquinolones.

*****

Can Floxies Drink Alcohol?

Many people have asked me if they can/should drink alcohol post-flox.

As with most things, the answer is – it depends, and everyone is different.

Some Floxies tolerate alcohol fine, while others don’t.

Alcohol is, of course, bad for you. It’s hard on the liver, and can lead to cirrhosis and alcoholic hepatitis. It burdens your liver’s detoxification abilities and hinders your ability to get rid of other toxins. Alcohol wreaks havoc on the gut microbiome, and can encourage candida growth. Alcohol weakens the immune system, and can make you more succeptible to other illnesses. I could go on and on because there are hundreds of articles about the harm that alcohol inflicts on the human body. No matter how many videos come out about tequila being a probiotic, or articles there are about wine containing resveritrol, alcohol is not a health elixir. It is not good for you.

HOWEVER, it is quite fun (IMO), and it even has some health benefits–it’s a painkiller and it reduces feelings of stress and anxiety. Alcohol has enough redeeming qualities that billions of people around the world, most of whom are aware of the negative effects of alcohol, consume it. I do, and so do many other floxies.

When I first got floxed, I stopped drinking for a while. My body was going hay-wire in every conceivable way, and I didn’t want to contribute to my problems by knowingly consuming a substance that is bad for me. I think that abstaining from alcohol during the acute phase of fluoroquinolone toxicity was the right thing for me to do.

Once my body stabilized (i.e. it stopped feeling like a bomb was going off in my body, and I even had some improved/normal days) I started having a drink every once in a while. Even though I could drink, I found that my tolerance for alcohol was greatly diminished. Before I got floxed I could handle three-ish drinks in an evening (and I thoroughly enjoyed drinking them). After getting floxed, my tolerance was one drink a night (that was barely enjoyable). I didn’t even want to drink more than that–I struggle to explain why, but I just felt done after 3/4 of a drink. Over time (I am now a bit over 5 years post-flox) my tolerance increased, and I can now comfortably have two alcoholic beverages in an evening. That’s plenty for me, in my personal opinion of how much I should/shouldn’t drink.

I never experienced a relapse in fluoroquinolone toxicity symptoms as a direct result of drinking alcohol, but other people have, and I encourage everyone who wants to drink post-flox to be very careful and cautious with alcohol consumption. Comments such as this one, from Bob (and the comment just above it when you click on the link, from Ann), are examples of alcohol triggering an increase in, or relapse of, fluoroquinolone toxicity symptoms:

After getting floxed I had relapses to alcohol which I only drank on vacation. I suspect this is due to severe kill off of gut flora. I am afraid to drink anymore.

This comment from Mark also notes that alcohol consumption can lead to fluoroquinolone toxicity symptom flares:

I cheated this weekend and drank alcohol/ate dairy. You know what? It flared up my cipro symptoms full force. Knee joints started cracking like crazy, achilles heal flare, etc. I’m convinced that we are all suffering an overgrowth of yeast and the faster we can get that under control, the healthier we will be.

Some people have a more moderate reaction to alcohol post-flox. This comment, from Ruth, is really interesting and insightful. Though she can drink alcohol without issue, she typically abstains:

I am able to drink again but my tolerance is greatly reduced. It won’t actually harm your gaba receptors because alcohol acts on gaba-b instead of gaba-a. I think it promotes healing.

When the alcohol downgrades the gaba-b subunit, I think the body makes repairs to some of the a subunits in order to put things back in balance.

I think when the FQ took out some of your gaba-a receptors your body gave you extra gaba-b receptors. This can make you a lot more receptive to the effects of alcohol. The b unit seems to be able to replace itself faster. That’s why alcohol withdrawal lasts a lot less long than benzodiazepine withdrawal. This is all just my theory. I have nothing to back it up with except my own experience.

Last year I got drunk at the Racine Zoo by accident. They hosted a teacher’s night and served spiked punches with no indication that they were alcoholic. I had what they had labeled as “Lesson Learned Lemonade.” I was thirsty so I slammed a big cup. At first I felt super relaxed and I thought that my nervous system must really be healing. Maybe it was that walk on the beach… and then I felt it. I knew it had been alcoholic. I ended up drunk off my ass, but not so bad that I couldn’t say “gamma amino butyric acid,” ha, ha. I got a brief relapse from that experience, of symptoms I had not had in a long time. After that ended my base line seemed higher.

So I think alcohol is not completely bad. However, it can devastate your gut microbiome, so I am very careful about it. I had a tiny tiny bit of Bailey’s at Christmas. I enjoyed it. Other than the holidays I abstain from alcohol for the sake of my healthy flora.

Although it won’t stop your nervous system from healing, remember that psych symptoms can also stem from an imbalance of healthy vs. unhealthy microbes. Alcohol can worsen that situation considerably so for the foreseeable future it is better to abstain. Farther down the road you will probably be able to have a beer now and then with no ill effects.

Some people have even found that alcohol has helped them. It is a pain reliever and relaxant. It reduces anxiety and stress – even the anxiety and stress that comes with getting poisoned by a pharmaceutical. Stress and anxiety reduction are crucial for healing from fluoroquinolone toxicity. Both Bronwen and Barbara noted that they felt better with moderate alcohol consumption.

Bronwen’s Comment:

As far as booze goes, I actually found one drink helped lessen my symptoms a bit when they were getting overwhelming in the evening – much to my surprise, but I have only ever read one other person that found the same thing – most find the opposite. Again, test yourself! I certainly could not have more than one drink. The liver is struggling along with the other organs, as the clearing house for toxins, so alcohol puts another burden on it.

Barbara’s Comment:

My saving grace is I am allowed wine 😁😁 hallelujah .I have been able to drink alcohol from the begining and in certain times when the pain was bad I swear it helped.

As you can see, reactions to alcohol post-flox vary considerably. So, what should your take-away from this post be? Should you drink alcohol, or not? I can’t answer that for you, because I have no idea how you respond to alcohol, or how much you enjoy consuming it. If alcohol isn’t your drug of choice, and you don’t particularly like it, don’t start drinking because some people have responded positively to its benefits. If you want to drink alcohol, it is, of course, best to do it in moderation. If you want to avoid all things that may trigger a relapse, or that are generally bad for the body, by all means, don’t drink. As with all advice for my floxie friends – it depends, everyone is different, and be careful.

 

Floxie Hope Podcast Episode 21 – James

James is featured in Episode 21 of The Floxie Hope Podcast.

Check it out:

https://itunes.apple.com/us/podcast/floxie-hope-podcast/id945226010

http://www.floxiehopepodcast.com/episode-021-james/

James also shared his story in writing, and you can read it here – https://floxiehope.com/james-story-hurt-by-metronidazole-then-cipro/. He goes into more detail in the podcast though, and I highly recommend that you listen in. Thank you for sharing your story, James!

James was 24 years old when he was floxed. He lost his grip strength after taking a single pill. After that, he experienced pain, burning pain in his legs, his eyes hurt, he had floaters in his vision, visual snow, loss of ability to sweat, weight loss, stiff and weak legs, nerve pain, brain fog, and anxiety.

He was acutely sick for 9 months. Even though he has recovered to the point where he is able to do his job again, he is not quite at 100% yet. He’s getting there though. He has a new perspective on health, healing, and happiness that is helping him immensely.

Thank you for listening to James’ insightful and uplifting story!

(Again, I apologize about the sound quality. There is still a lot of beneficial information in the podcast, despite the static and echoes.)

 

Mitigating Fluoroquinolone Damage

What if a loved one must take a fluoroquinolone because it is the only option available to save their life? How do they avoid getting “floxed” and experiencing the devastation that fluoroquinolones have brought to too many lives?

Undeniably, there is a range of reactions to fluoroquinolones – from people not reacting badly at all, to people being permanently disabled and in excruciating pain, and everything in between. If a loved one must take a fluoroquinolone because it is the only viable option, is there any way to push them toward the “not hurt” end of the spectrum?

Who Gets Floxed?

At this time, no one knows what makes someone susceptible to getting “floxed.” No one knows why some people tolerate fluoroquionlones well but other people don’t. No one knows why an individual can tolerate fluoroquinolones fine at one time, but have a horrible reaction another time. No one knows what genetic predispositions contribute to some people getting hurt by fluoroquionlones.

The epidemiologists say that the risk of fluoroquinolone-induced tendon ruptures is higher in those over the age of 60. However, there are many “floxies” under the age of 60, and many of them suffer from tendon ruptures and other musculoskeletal problems.

It is hypothesized in, “Fluoroquinolone Antibiotics and Thyroid Problems: Is there a Connection?” that, “anyone with any underlying genetic predisposition, or possibly harboring a subclinical, latent, or silent endocrinopathy might be ‘pushed over the edge’ into full blown clinical pathology” by fluoroquinolones. But I have a friend who is over the age of 60 and who has thyroid problems, as well as osteoporosis, who recently took a course of Cipro and was fine afterward. I saw her yesterday and she is doing well. I would have thought that she would have been predisposed toward an adverse reaction… but she wasn’t.

As a strong and athletic 32 year old who had no history of illness, I certainly didn’t think that I was predisposed to having an adverse reaction to Cipro, but it happened. Cipro made me sick for a while.

There seems to be a certain amount of “Russian Roulette” going on when one takes a fluoroquinolone. There aren’t any tests to determine who will react poorly to fluoroquinolones, and even known risk factors only sometimes make a difference. Some people seem to get lucky, while others get very, very unlucky. I realize that attributing adverse reactions to bad luck and “Russian Roulette” is a frustrating non-answer, but, unfortunately, that’s where we’re at right now – the land of frustrating non-answers. Welcome to being a floxie.

Despite the seeming randomness of adverse reactions, there is sufficient evidence that people who are over the age of 60, athletes, those who have a history of psychiatric illness, those with a history of benzodiazepine withdrawal, people who regularly use NSAIDs, people using corticosteroids, people who have an existing autoimmune or endocrine disorders, those who are immunocompromised, and people who have a mitochondrial disorder (in any of its manifestations, including ME/CFS and fibromyalgia) should avoid fluoroquinolones if at all possible. (More about this can be found in the post, “Don’t Take Cipro, Levaquin or Avelox If….” on Hormones Matter.)

When it’s the Only Option

Given that few people think that an adverse drug reaction will happen to them, and that antibiotic resistance is reducing the number of safe antibiotics available to treat many infections, many people are stuck with fluoroquinolones being the only option available to them.

If this is the situation for you (yes, I do realize that many/most floxies would rather die than take a fluoroquinolone again, but that’s not the case for everyone) or a loved one, is there anything that can be done to mitigate the damage done by the drug?

Maybe.

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Mitigating Fluoroquinolone Damage

Studies have noted that magnesium and vitamin E can mitigate some of the damage done by fluoroquinolones. In, Musculoskeletal Complications of Fluoroquinolones: Guidelines and Precautions for Usage in the Athletic Population, it is noted that:

“Pfister et al [25] studied the effects of oral vitamin E (tocopherol) and magnesium supplementation on ciprofloxacin-associated chondrotoxicity. Juvenile rats were divided into 4 groups: those fed a normal diet, a vitamin E– enriched diet, a magnesium-enriched diet, or a diet enriched with both vitamin E and magnesium. These diets were initiated 10 days before the rats were given ciprofloxacin. Two days after fluoroquinolone exposure, cartilage samples from the knee joints were histologically examined, and cartilage and plasma concentrations of magnesium, calcium, and vitamin E were measured. Fluoroquinolone-associated cartilage changes were observed in all groups, but the supplemented groups showed significantly less change, with the magnesium and vitamin E combination group demonstrating the least change. Both plasma and cartilage concentrations of magnesium and tocopherol were significantly higher in the supplemented groups than in the animals that received the normal diet, which supports the potential role of magnesium deficiency in the pathogenesis of fluoroquinolone-associated chondrotoxicity.”

Does that mean that magnesium and vitamin E should be taken along with fluoroquinolones to mitigate damage? Maybe. It should be noted that magnesium inhibits fluoroquinolones both for better and for worse, and that the magnesium may decrease the ability of the FQ to fight the bacterial infection.

Additionally, it is noted in “Bactericidal Antibiotics Induce Mitochondrial Dysfunction and Oxidative Damage in Mammalian Cells,” that:

“Mice treated with clinically relevant doses of bactericidal antibiotics similarly showed signs of oxidative damage in blood tests, tissue analysis, and gene expression studies. This ROS-mediated damage could be reversed by the powerful antioxidant N-acetyl-l-cysteine (NAC) without disrupting the bacteria-killing properties of the antibiotics.”

Since NAC doesn’t disrupt the bacteria-killing properties of the antibiotics, it’s a better bet (IMO).

It is also noted in Musculoskeletal Complications of Fluoroquinolones: Guidelines and Precautions for Usage in the Athletic Population, that:

“A mitochondrial-targeted form of ubiquinone (MitoQ) demonstrated a larger protective effect than did untargeted ubiquinone. Oxidative stress frequently occurs in the mitochondria [22], and fluoroquinolone-induced oxidative damage to mitochondria in tenocytes and chondrocytes has been reported [26].”

Some “floxies” have found MitoQ to be helpful in healing fluoroquinolone-induced damage. Perhaps it can also prevent the damage from occurring.

If a loved one of mine had to take a fluoroquinolone, I would try to get him or her to load up on magnesium before-hand, and I would try to get vitamin E, NAC, and MitoQ into him/her while the FQ was being administered.

I certainly wouldn’t claim to know for sure that they would be safer while taking those antioxidants, but it’s worth a try.

Russian Roulette

People should be aware of the dangers of fluoroquinolones, and they should know that there is a certain amount of Russian Roulette that is being played with every pill administered. For better or for worse, I don’t think that people really understand fluoroquinolone toxicity until it happens to them. As scary as it is for those of us who have been hurt by fluoroquinolones to stand by and watch while our loved ones take these pills, some of us will have to do just that at some point. Maybe some of the fluoroquinolone-induced damage can be mitigated by the supplements mentioned above. I hope so.

 

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Happy Anniversary Floxie Hope!

I started www.floxiehope.com one year ago today – on June 20, 2013.  It’s my floxiehopeiversary / blogiversary / siteiversary.  A drink will be had to celebrate.

In the year that it has been up, Floxie Hope has had 177,547 page views from, I dunno, a somewhat smaller number of individual viewers.  I have argued that the number of people that have seen my articles is close to the number of page views for Floxie Hope because I publish a large portion of my articles on other sites – www.hormonesmatter.com and www.collective-evolution.com.  I have no idea how many people have viewed my articles on those sites, but I like to think that the number of page views on Floxie Hope is a close approximation to the number of people reached.  177,547 people reached in a year – not too bad, if I do say so myself.

One of my posts, How Pharmaceuticals Came To Be The 4th Leading Cause Of Death In America, on Collective Evolution, has 12,000 Facebook shares, and it got picked up by Real Farmacy and got another 9,400 shares.  Awwww, yeah!  Sorry for tooting my own horn, but I’m really pleased about how many people have read what I’ve written about the dangers of fluoroquinolones.

Most people need to hear a message a few times before they believe it to be true.  Some people heard about the dangers of fluoroquinolones for the first time through something that I wrote.  Some people heard it a second or third time, and started to believe that it was true after reading one of my articles.  Some people went back to the Links & Resources page of Floxie Hope and noted that there are hundreds of peer reviewed journal articles on the dangers of these drugs.  Some people looked up the sources that I cited and realized that I may actually know what I’m talking about when I say that cipro, levaquin, avelox, floxin and the other fluoroquinolones are dangerous drugs that are hurting people on a cellular level.  The message is sinking into people’s consciousness one viewer at a time.

I’m pretty pleased about the number of people reached.  The word is getting out.

An amazing community has been formed on www.floxiehope.com.  If you look through the comments, you’ll see that wonderful, intelligent, insightful people have provided support and encouragement to their fellow floxies on Floxie Hope.  I am so pleased and honored to know each person who has shared his or her knowledge and insight.  Your words of wisdom and your encouragement are greatly appreciated!

I have come to consider the people who I correspond with about fluoroquinolone toxicity to be friends.  My floxie friends are strong, resilient, interesting, thoughtful, smart, generous people that I am so happy to have in my life.  🙂  I’m sorry that we have come together in the way that we have.  But alas, some good can come from bad, and the relationships between floxies are as valuable and precious as any other relationship.

The feedback that I get from the people who have been positively affected by Floxie Hope keeps me going.  I hear from people who let me know that the information on Floxie Hope has given them guidance, direction, and, most importantly, hope.  I tear up with joy when a friend tells me that an article that I wrote helped him to convince his doctor not to prescribe fluoroquinolones frivolously; or when I hear that what I wrote has helped the family of a floxie friend to understand what she is going through; or when I hear that the message of hope and resilience that I am trying to spread saves a relationship or even a life.

I’m glad that I could help.

You are not alone.  None of us are alone in this struggle.  We have each other.  It’s an honor to be part of a community of people that supports and cares for its members.  None of us ever wished to be a part of the floxie community, but it’s nice that while we’re here, we have great people around providing encouragement and support.

A year ago today, I started Floxie Hope because I knew that I needed to hear stories of hope and healing when I was sick and terrified.  When I was sick, I needed to know that some people recover and I needed to hear that I would be okay.  I ended up getting that message from other places, and through time, trial and error.  Now people can get that message through this site.  The stories of hope, healing, perseverance, strength, etc. that are on Floxie Hope have helped so many people, and I am so thankful to everyone who has provided their story.  You are all appreciated!

I think that I have been successful in making Floxie Hope a place where people can gain hope and help.  It couldn’t have been done without the rest of you, so I thank each and every one of you who has helped by reading, sharing, commenting and/or writing for Floxie Hope.

The next step will be to make change.  There is nothing that is okay about people getting hurt by fluoroquinolones.  Fluoroquinolones are dangerous drugs that should not be used frivolously.  The fact that they are being used frivolously and that they are hurting people is wrong.  It is a problem and it needs to change.  We, as a community, will make it change.  We have the truth, and quite a bit of scientific evidence on our side.  With some perseverance, intelligent strategy and luck, we’ll make it happen.

Advocacy is something that can be done when you have your strength and health back.  Those who don’t have the strength or health to advocate need hope.  I hope that you gain hope from this site.  It’s what it’s here for.

Xoxo

-Lisa

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Missing Emails

I received about a dozen emails from people who reached out to me via the Floxie Hope “Contact me” page between February 17th and 20th.  I read the emails on my phone and noted that I needed to get back to those people.  When I went to respond to the emails, all messages that I received from the 17th through the 20th were gone.  They weren’t in my inbox.  They weren’t in my deleted emails folder.  They weren’t in my spam folder.  They were just gone.

The sucktasticness of Yahoo mail is annoying.

I know that this is a really trivial thing to post about, but I wanted to put a note out on a forum where people could access it easily to let those who wrote me know why I didn’t write them back.

To those of you who are waiting for a response – Can you please email me again?  I’m sorry for not being responsive!  I truly do try to respond to every email that comes to me.  I was looking forward to responding to each of you because I remember reading interesting insights and observations.  Now I no longer have your email, or your email address, and therefore my ability to converse with you is hindered.

It was suggested by a friend that I ask the NSA for copies of the emails that have disappeared.  Hahahahhahaha!  That would take a while.

I don’t think that I’m on the radar of anyone who would want to steal my emails in a nefarious way.  It would be nifty if I was, but I doubt that I am.

Anyhow, I opened a new gmail account with the hope that it will be less annoying than Yahoo’s mail system.

When I went to forward all of my old conversations initiated through floxie hope to the new gmail address, many of them were missing.  It’s probably just a glitch in the yahoo system, right?  Or the sucky way that yahoo organizes emails that are from a similar address kept me from finding the emails that I was looking for, right?  No one is messing with my email system and stealing my emails, right?

NSA peeps – can you please retrieve my emails for me?  :p

If someone is messing with my email system, they now know that I will blog about it and out them.  If nobody is messing with my email system (most likely) y’all know not to use yahoo mail because it stinks.

And floxie friends – be hopeful.  That’s all.  Be hopeful.  Recovery does happen for many.

And once you feel better and completely recovered you can worry about trivial crap like missing emails instead of wondering about whether or not you’re going to die.  It’s kind of nice to worry about trivial crap.

🙂

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