Monthly Archives: October 2019

Reluctantly Going to the Doctor

After getting floxed I developed a significant amount of skepticism toward Western Medicine. I realized the damage that Western Medicine, especially pharmaceuticals, can do, and I stopped believing that doctors can fix many issues. I learned that Western Medicine is really lousy at dealing with multi-symptom chronic illnesses of all types–including the ones that are recognized (like autoimmune diseases)–but especially the ones that are not recognized (like fluoroquinolone toxicity) or ill-defined (like ME/CFS, fibromyalgia, etc.). I saw that there is very little that can be done to help people who have suffered from iatrogenic illness, and that often (though not always, of course) when Western Medicine doctors encounter a patient who has been hurt by a pharmaceutical or medical procedure their response is hostile or ignorant.

With that knowledge, I proceeded to tell myself that I was better off without Western Medicine. Despite my insurer’s pleas, I refused to sign up with a primary care physician (out of laziness and inertia as much as fear and adversity) and I told myself that I was healthier and happier without getting poked, prodded, and possibly poisoned by doctors. For the most part, my avoidance of the Western Medical system has been serving me fine. I have been healthy and happy for many years.

However, I recently had an issue that needed to be fixed by a Western Medicine doctor – or, at least the tools of a Western Medicine doctor. I needed a minor surgery. A scalpel and Novocain were necessary to fix my issue (an issue that is somewhat embarrassing, has nothing to do with fluoroquinolone toxicity, and that no one wants to envision, so I’m going to do my best to get through this post without saying exactly what it was). No diet changes would cure me, nor could acupuncture, nor could exercises, or anything else other than a scalpel (the Novocain wasn’t strictly necessary, but it sure made getting cut easier for everyone involved). So, I went to a surgery center, got my minor surgery, and am on my way to being healed. The doctor who fixed my issue was good. He was kind, thoughtful, and he did what he needed to do to fix my issue in as quick and painless a way as possible. I am grateful to him for what he did, and I’m glad that the technology to quickly and easily fix my issue was available.

Western Medicine is really good at fixing well-defined problems that involve scalpels and other cutting tools. Western Medicine put me back together.

About a week after I got my issue fixed, my mom fell and broke her hip. She needed a partial hip replacement and she got one. It’s still a recent development, and it’s TBD how well she was put back together, but, my point is that Western Medicine doctors are good at dealing with broken bones (and pus pockets). They also have good tools for numbing people and knocking them out. The painkillers that they have are also quite effective (though not without consequence). I’m hopeful, actually fairly confident, that the doctors did a good job putting my mom back together, and that she’ll recover well.

I wish that Western Medicine was as good with multi-symptom, multi-system, complex illnesses as it is with broken bones, pus pockets, and other issues that can be fixed with surgery. I wish that fixing gut microbiome dysbiosis was as common and easy as fixing a broken bone. I wish that hormonal imbalances were as easy to detect and cure as an abscess. I wish that adverse drug reactions were easy to detect, and that the promise in all the commercials of “see your doctor if xyz occurs” resulted in a doctor who knew how to treat and cure adverse drug reactions. But Western Medicine isn’t good with multi-symptom, multi-system, chronic illnesses – it just isn’t.

But they are good with broken bones and surgeries, and I am very, very, very thankful that I got my issue taken care of, and that my mom got a surgery to put her hip back together.

Western Medicine has its place. And as much as I’d like to avoid doctors, I’m going to go to them when necessary. I’m guessing that you will too. I really wish that they were better at treating fluoroquinolone toxicity and other similar issues – or even better at treating the symptoms of fluoroquinolone toxicity. Maybe someday.

*****

 

Deciding Which Treatments to Try

The following is a guest post from Stephanie. If you are interested in writing a guest post for FloxieHope.com, please let me know

*****

I really get bombarded all the time with, “go get stem cells how could you not?” I get so anxiety ridden from it. I know people mean well but it’s so hard on me. It feels like harassment and not love at certain points–like they can’t handle me being sick so I have to heal for them to be okay.

I just want people to know that whatever they do to heal is their own decision.

I’m constantly deciding–how much do I want to be tested on, and what treatments do I want to try?

I’ve been floxed for almost five years and it’s a 5 steps forward and 4 steps backwards dance where I hold onto the one step forward as best I can–because it’s better than the times where it’s 6 steps backwards and I fight just to get back to where I was.

The crazy part is that it all becomes a matter of how much I want to be tested and treated, AND how much I want to pay for it.

There still isn’t enough data to answer one simple question: Will this procedure help me or hurt me?

Because these side effects feel like a bomb went off inside my body that made things crazy, it feels like it’s impossible for any doctor–western or natural–to give me a straight answer of, Will this treatment help or hurt?

People can list out what helps but no one can know for each person. How I look at it is we are all being tested on to get more data and to pay for it.

So, I constantly have to weigh out, do I want to risk what I have for an unknown promise of healing?

That carrot is so tempting and so hard to answer.

For me, I weigh everything on what happens if it goes wrong how much will it mess up my life. How much can I afford this to mess up things?

My husband has medical issues too and he needs to be made to take care of things too.

So, it’s a dance that is never ending.

When people ask me why don’t I try this or that it’s because I don’t like to be poked and prodded and tested like a guinea pig.

I have to feel like the odds are somehow going to be in my favor because I’ve seen various experimental treatments make people so much worse, and I often think that it’s not worth the risk.

It’s easy to talk when it’s not your life and you are not the test bunny.

Why we have to pay for everything is beyond me.

Why we have to constantly be told yes these are side effects and you get to pay to maybe get your health back is beyond me.

So, for anyone out there that is pressuring someone like me to try something, please understand it’s really easy when you are not the one being poked, prodded, and tested–when it’s not your body and your life that may come crashing down if the treatment doesn’t work as-anticipated.

It’s not easy to pick what to do and how much you are willing to spend to go through treatments that haven’t been proven to work for everyone, much less everyone.

*****