Tag Archives: anxiety

Healing from Fluoroquinolone Toxicity Takes Time, Perseverance, Strength, and Kindness

Ruth wrote this as an update/guest post. You can read Ruth’s story of fluoroquinolone toxicity in “Ruth’s Story – Cipro Toxicity.” You can also listen to Ruth’s story through her episode of The Floxie Hope Podcast. Ruth has offered her insight and wisdom to thousands of “floxies” over the years. As of the publishing of this post, her story has almost 1,600 comments. If you read through them, you will see how Ruth has generously given her time, insight, wisdom, and advice to those who are struggling. The comments are just a small sampling of what she has given to the fluoroquinolone toxicity community. Ruth has given so much to others while going through the ups and downs of fluoroquinolone toxicity herself. She is a kind, thoughtful, generous, person, and I am honored to call her a friend. As you will see from the post below, she can use a bit of encouragement and appreciation, so I’ll take the time to say thank you to her. THANK YOU, RUTH! 

Floxiehope update 7/19/18

I’m not 100% healed yet. I had another relapse lasting a few months during the second half of this school year. My blood pressure kept going up in response to doing just about anything. I felt overwhelmed just about all the time. Earlier in the school year I would go work out after school and feel marvelous afterward. When the relapse started by the time my teaching day ended my blood pressure would be up way too high for me to exercise. This caused my base line blood pressure to hover around 140/90, which is what happens when I don’t do any cardio. But by the end of a day it would be 170/110 or higher.

Friends kept telling me to go on medication for high blood pressure but I just didn’t feel like my problem was with the cardiovascular system. It seemed like my autonomic nervous system was sending the wrong message and that was what was ramping up my blood pressure and heart rate. If I was about to be eaten by a bear, this would have been an appropriate response. My body was responding to the stimulation of a normal teaching day as if I was in mortal danger. But like most flox symptoms, I knew this could stop happening at any moment, and I really did not want to be on strong antihypertensives when that happened.

Since the school year ended I have been feeling better. Still mildly hypertensive, but better. I need to clean up my diet and exercise more. I’m working on that but I have not been checking my BP right now as if it is a little high that upsets me, which is counterproductive at this point. I don’t get that feeling of increasing anxiety, of things being overwhelming or of my blood pressure sky rocketing. If anything I feel a lot more normal than I have for years.

Not being able to work out definitely hurt me when fireworks season started, so I got really sore. At first my back hurt, then my core and abs hurt and then nothing hurt and I could lift whatever I needed to. It was amazing how fast my body recovered and gained strength. I’ve been more motivated to work out and especially to strengthen my core.

I would say the most troubling aspect of my post flox life right now is new floxies who ask me for advice and then get completely freaked out that I still have relapses and am not symptom free. They accuse me of lying to them. They block me on Facebook. They tell me I have not really healed very much and they need to find someone to talk to who has healed. Once again, I felt the temptation to turn my back on the flox community forever. It seems that since I didn’t heal 100% some floxies feel I have nothing to say. I almost believed them.

But my story is my story. My healing journey is my own and no one else’s. It is my belief that I will see 100% healing but I think it will take between six to seven years total. I think the very stressful job I had prior to this year pushed my nervous system to make more repairs and when it did that I felt it. I think this year I pushed myself way too hard doing administrative tasks for teaching with a nervous system that still does not like too much of that kind of thing. I love my new school and Wisconsin has merit based pay for teachers. I put in a lot of time on grades and lesson plans so that at the end of the year I had the documentation I needed to show I did my job. It pushed my nervous system when I was spending ten hours on my day off doing stuff for school. That’s a long time to sit and enter data into a computer. For anybody.

I think also there is an emotional aspect to dealing with getting floxed and I couldn’t do it right away. I couldn’t even cry without it feeling like someone was squeezing my brain. I didn’t have normal emotions for years. Aspects of my personality were missing that didn’t come back until year three. Suddenly, this school year, I had the emotional capacity to ask, “What just happened to me? How do I feel about this? Am I coping all right with this?”

I was so busy though, working so hard at my teaching job and I did a lot of arranging music for my choir this year also. They do better with three part music than four part, so I arranged public domain hymns into three part choir anthems. Between the two jobs every spare minute was spent concentrating, bent over a computer screen. But my brain didn’t want to concentrate on all that stuff or on teaching my classes, it wanted to process what had happened to me when the flox bomb went off in my body and brain four years ago. Some of what I was experiencing toward the end of this school year may actually have been PTSD.

So as fireworks season winds down and I have more time I am working at healing not just my nervous system but my spirit. I’m giving my brain time to just do nothing, think of nothing. I’m giving my body time in nature to just experience things like swimming and hiking. I have had to let go of the dream of a perfectly clean house before school starts. I have had to allow myself time to heal. Not physically. I am pretty much physically healed. Time to heal mentally, emotionally and spiritually.

I probably am still lacking a few receptors for gamma amino butryic acid compared to if I had not been floxed. I do believe that those will be replaced eventually because I believe in neural plasticity.

I am still a bit low on magnesium, but now it takes working hours in 95 degree heat and humidity for me to notice it. My teeth started to feel loose while I was drenched in sweat working to set up fireworks shows, but as soon as I took some magnesium they tightened up and the anxiety I had felt building went away. I used to notice symptoms of magnesium deficiency like that if I didn’t take some every two hours just sitting around indoors.

I used to have to eat breakfast and take a magnesium pill the moment I woke up. Now I walk two miles or more before breakfast and I don’t always remember to take magnesium before I do it. I have noticed that my legs don’t hurt no matter how much I walk or stand. It takes a lot for me to get physically tired. So I am making progress, and I definitely think my cells will once again be healthy and filled with magnesium and I won’t have to take as much as many magnesium pills as I do now to keep them that way.

I think what really remains for me to reach 100% healing is for me to completely come to terms with what happened to me, to recover from the PTSD the experience seems to have caused. I was in a situation in which my body was failing me, I didn’t know how bad it was going to get or even if I would die. The flox bomb going off can cause some shell shock. Only if you have experienced it can you understand that, and realize I am not meaning to diminish the PTSD experienced by our soldiers. But like them, keeping busy can only delay the PTSD symptoms. Eventually, our mind says, “Hey, this thing happened, and it was really bad, and I really need some help to cope with it, because I really couldn’t cope at the time and I’m not sure I can now.” We can get physical symptoms that are a manifestation of our inability to cope– like my blood pressure and heart rate constantly becoming elevated. I wasn’t overwhelmed with my teaching duties, per se, although I may have pushed a little nervous system healing by doing so much computer work. What really caused my last relapse was my absolute need to stop, to pause, to reflect, to heal from that flox bomb. Not physically. That part of my healing is very nearly complete. I need to heal mentally.

I need to stop and rest so that my mind can process what happened and be ok with it and pause and see that I really am ok now.

I think what I have to say has value even though I am not 100% recovered yet. It would be nice if there were some magic pill, a miracle cure that could make flox damage go away instantly. There’s not. And even after the physical damage heals, there is the emotional aftermath. Personally, I think someone who has coped with the flox bomb for four and half years may just be able to give better advice about coping with getting floxed than the person who managed to heal in a few weeks. Even if a floxie does everything the quick healer did it does mean he or she will heal as quickly. We are all different. There are no guarantees. There is no protocol for treating FQAD. It’s great when someone can share a supplement they took and someone else feels a bit better from it, but none of us are sharing overnight cures, because there are none.

Getting floxed does a tremendous amount of damage to the human body. That the body can heal it is amazing. That it can take a significant amount of time to do so is frustrating. That it sometimes cannot heal all the damage is a real possibility. Talking to people who healed slowly, who faced the fact that they were damaged badly enough that they may not heal all the way, is going to provide wisdom that is way more important than what supplement or treatment you could try.

I have always believed that improving parasympathetic nervous system function was at the core of healing floxies. Learning coping skills is all about choosing “rest and digest” over “fight or flight” no matter what is happening to you. Not saying it’s easy. But it’s a choice of learning to live life despite your circumstances, or deciding your life is over because your circumstances aren’t good. I have learned to make a great life for myself even when my circumstances were pretty crummy.

When I look back over the past four and half years, most of my memories are good. There are some pretty horrible ones in there too, but once I got past about month four or five, I could live even with the symptoms I had. When I look back on those times I remember the things I did, my accomplishments, and the people I spent time with. I really don’t remember the symptoms I was having, or if I do it is in passing and they certainly don’t dominate my memories.

Here’s something else to consider. How many people do you know with perfect health? Everybody has some issue(s) they are dealing with. Some of the middle aged women who work at my school have told me of their struggles with menopause and I have to say, other than that rough stretch toward the end of the school year, I generally feel a lot better than they do. I’m floxed, yes, but I can think of a lot of people who aren’t floxies who aren’t as healthy or as active as I am.

I’m four and a half years out and I still have some healing to do. But when I look at where I started compared to how I feel today, I know I am blessed. I’m incredibly saddened when floxies decide I have nothing to say to them because I didn’t heal 100% yet.

I think we need to treat one another better in the flox community. I actually know of some people who healed 100% who no longer are willing to support other floxies. Perhaps the behavior of floxies seeking help actually drove them away from the flox community. When seeking out advice of another floxed person, it is important not to forget that this person probably went through hell and may still be struggling with issues, struggling to cope with what happened to them, just as you are. Most are happy to share advice and emotional support, but few of us are medical professionals and we aren’t getting paid to help other floxies. We do that out of the goodness of our hearts. If advice we give isn’t helpful, then say thank you and move on. But don’t expect any floxie to have the magic bullet. There isn’t one. It is going to take time for you to heal.

Our society does not like to admit that some things that are painful are going to be that way for awhile. When I was widowed back in 1993 I had friends tell me that if I was still feeling sad in a month or two there is probably something wrong and I would need to get some professional help. I know a floxie who was prescribed Benzodiazepines because she lost a loved one. When she took Cipro it threw her into Benzo withdrawal, but she would never have been in that situation but for this idea that any suffering is intolerable and must be medicated away. This may be why our medical system does such a terrible job of treating chronic illness. It is quicker to prescribe a pain pill to get rid of the symptoms than to really dig into the cause of the illness.

Anyone who has dealt with grief knows the time line my friends suggested when my husband died was way out of whack. The floxie time line is more similar to the grief time line than anything else I can think of. And like grief, it may never totally go away. It will never be as if you had not loved and lost. You are forever changed. It will never be as if you were never floxed. I am forever changed because I got floxed even if I have more healthy mitochondria then when I started, if every cell of my body is brimming with magnesium and all my antioxidants are functioning beautifully and if I have more GABA receptors than I started with, I still experienced the flox bomb go off in my body and it was beyond horrible. That experience will always be with me as much as the moment I heard that my husband had been killed.

A few Sundays ago I played a hymn in church that had comforted me after Danny died, and suddenly I was crying so hard that I couldn’t sing and it was like I was 25 years old again and going through all that grief the first time. Some wounds don’t ever really go away, but you can live with them. You can survive and thrive and sometimes, even grief feels good. I can cry again without it feeling like someone is squeezing my brain. How I cherish that blessed release tears can bring!Now I can cry about the flox bomb too, and probably, if I live to be 80, there will be a day that a certain memory hits me and I cry about getting floxed all over again.

I am just asking floxies who seek advice from other floxies to keep in mind that what we are all dealing with is a chronic illness. It lasts a long time for just about everyone. Some people are able to heal from it, which is amazing and wonderful. But even those who don’t heal, but learn to cope, have done a tremendous thing and overcome a lot. They should be celebrated and listened to, because learning to cope is over half the battle, and some scars are simply going to be there forever. It is way past time for the medical community to stop doing this to people. But at least we can treat each other well.

** The story above is truthful, accurate and told to the best of the ability of the writer. It is not intended as medical advice. No person who submits his or her story, nor the people associated with Floxie Hope, diagnoses or treats any illness. The story above should not be substituted for professionally provided medical advice. Please consult your doctor before trying anything that has been mentioned in this story, or in any other story on this site. Please also note that people have varying responses to the treatments mentioned in each story. What helps one person may not help, and may even hurt, another person. It is important that you understand that supplements, IVs, essential oils, and all other treatments, effect people differently depending on the millions of variables that make each of us unique. Please use appropriate caution and prudence, and get professional medical advice.

 

Can Floxies Drink Alcohol?

Many people have asked me if they can/should drink alcohol post-flox.

As with most things, the answer is – it depends, and everyone is different.

Some Floxies tolerate alcohol fine, while others don’t.

Alcohol is, of course, bad for you. It’s hard on the liver, and can lead to cirrhosis and alcoholic hepatitis. It burdens your liver’s detoxification abilities and hinders your ability to get rid of other toxins. Alcohol wreaks havoc on the gut microbiome, and can encourage candida growth. Alcohol weakens the immune system, and can make you more succeptible to other illnesses. I could go on and on because there are hundreds of articles about the harm that alcohol inflicts on the human body. No matter how many videos come out about tequila being a probiotic, or articles there are about wine containing resveritrol, alcohol is not a health elixir. It is not good for you.

HOWEVER, it is quite fun (IMO), and it even has some health benefits–it’s a painkiller and it reduces feelings of stress and anxiety. Alcohol has enough redeeming qualities that billions of people around the world, most of whom are aware of the negative effects of alcohol, consume it. I do, and so do many other floxies.

When I first got floxed, I stopped drinking for a while. My body was going hay-wire in every conceivable way, and I didn’t want to contribute to my problems by knowingly consuming a substance that is bad for me. I think that abstaining from alcohol during the acute phase of fluoroquinolone toxicity was the right thing for me to do.

Once my body stabilized (i.e. it stopped feeling like a bomb was going off in my body, and I even had some improved/normal days) I started having a drink every once in a while. Even though I could drink, I found that my tolerance for alcohol was greatly diminished. Before I got floxed I could handle three-ish drinks in an evening (and I thoroughly enjoyed drinking them). After getting floxed, my tolerance was one drink a night (that was barely enjoyable). I didn’t even want to drink more than that–I struggle to explain why, but I just felt done after 3/4 of a drink. Over time (I am now a bit over 5 years post-flox) my tolerance increased, and I can now comfortably have two alcoholic beverages in an evening. That’s plenty for me, in my personal opinion of how much I should/shouldn’t drink.

I never experienced a relapse in fluoroquinolone toxicity symptoms as a direct result of drinking alcohol, but other people have, and I encourage everyone who wants to drink post-flox to be very careful and cautious with alcohol consumption. Comments such as this one, from Bob (and the comment just above it when you click on the link, from Ann), are examples of alcohol triggering an increase in, or relapse of, fluoroquinolone toxicity symptoms:

After getting floxed I had relapses to alcohol which I only drank on vacation. I suspect this is due to severe kill off of gut flora. I am afraid to drink anymore.

This comment from Mark also notes that alcohol consumption can lead to fluoroquinolone toxicity symptom flares:

I cheated this weekend and drank alcohol/ate dairy. You know what? It flared up my cipro symptoms full force. Knee joints started cracking like crazy, achilles heal flare, etc. I’m convinced that we are all suffering an overgrowth of yeast and the faster we can get that under control, the healthier we will be.

Some people have a more moderate reaction to alcohol post-flox. This comment, from Ruth, is really interesting and insightful. Though she can drink alcohol without issue, she typically abstains:

I am able to drink again but my tolerance is greatly reduced. It won’t actually harm your gaba receptors because alcohol acts on gaba-b instead of gaba-a. I think it promotes healing.

When the alcohol downgrades the gaba-b subunit, I think the body makes repairs to some of the a subunits in order to put things back in balance.

I think when the FQ took out some of your gaba-a receptors your body gave you extra gaba-b receptors. This can make you a lot more receptive to the effects of alcohol. The b unit seems to be able to replace itself faster. That’s why alcohol withdrawal lasts a lot less long than benzodiazepine withdrawal. This is all just my theory. I have nothing to back it up with except my own experience.

Last year I got drunk at the Racine Zoo by accident. They hosted a teacher’s night and served spiked punches with no indication that they were alcoholic. I had what they had labeled as “Lesson Learned Lemonade.” I was thirsty so I slammed a big cup. At first I felt super relaxed and I thought that my nervous system must really be healing. Maybe it was that walk on the beach… and then I felt it. I knew it had been alcoholic. I ended up drunk off my ass, but not so bad that I couldn’t say “gamma amino butyric acid,” ha, ha. I got a brief relapse from that experience, of symptoms I had not had in a long time. After that ended my base line seemed higher.

So I think alcohol is not completely bad. However, it can devastate your gut microbiome, so I am very careful about it. I had a tiny tiny bit of Bailey’s at Christmas. I enjoyed it. Other than the holidays I abstain from alcohol for the sake of my healthy flora.

Although it won’t stop your nervous system from healing, remember that psych symptoms can also stem from an imbalance of healthy vs. unhealthy microbes. Alcohol can worsen that situation considerably so for the foreseeable future it is better to abstain. Farther down the road you will probably be able to have a beer now and then with no ill effects.

Some people have even found that alcohol has helped them. It is a pain reliever and relaxant. It reduces anxiety and stress – even the anxiety and stress that comes with getting poisoned by a pharmaceutical. Stress and anxiety reduction are crucial for healing from fluoroquinolone toxicity. Both Bronwen and Barbara noted that they felt better with moderate alcohol consumption.

Bronwen’s Comment:

As far as booze goes, I actually found one drink helped lessen my symptoms a bit when they were getting overwhelming in the evening – much to my surprise, but I have only ever read one other person that found the same thing – most find the opposite. Again, test yourself! I certainly could not have more than one drink. The liver is struggling along with the other organs, as the clearing house for toxins, so alcohol puts another burden on it.

Barbara’s Comment:

My saving grace is I am allowed wine 😁😁 hallelujah .I have been able to drink alcohol from the begining and in certain times when the pain was bad I swear it helped.

As you can see, reactions to alcohol post-flox vary considerably. So, what should your take-away from this post be? Should you drink alcohol, or not? I can’t answer that for you, because I have no idea how you respond to alcohol, or how much you enjoy consuming it. If alcohol isn’t your drug of choice, and you don’t particularly like it, don’t start drinking because some people have responded positively to its benefits. If you want to drink alcohol, it is, of course, best to do it in moderation. If you want to avoid all things that may trigger a relapse, or that are generally bad for the body, by all means, don’t drink. As with all advice for my floxie friends – it depends, everyone is different, and be careful.

 

Floxie Hope Podcast Episode 18 – Clara

I had the pleasure of interviewing Clara for episode 18 of The Floxie Hope Podcast.

Please check it out!

http://www.floxiehopepodcast.com/episode-018-clara/

https://itunes.apple.com/us/podcast/floxie-hope-podcast/id945226010

You can download all episodes of The Floxie Hope Podcast through any podcatcher app that connects to iTunes.

In this episode of The Floxie Hope Podcast Clara goes over her fluoroquinolone toxicity symptoms, as well as some things that have helped her. She gives wonderful insight and advice!

After taking Cipro, Clara’s toxicity symptoms included:

  • Nausea
  • Loss of appetite
  • Insomnia
  • Loose teeth
  • Bleeding gums
  • Getting sick easily / suppressed immune system
  • Anxiety
  • Depression
  • Fatigue
  • Brain fog
  • And more

Clara has improved greatly with the assistance of a naturopathic doctor who focuses on balancing her hormones. She has also benefitted from an anti-candida diet, and several supplements. Please listen to the podcast for more information about her journey.

Thank you so much for being on the podcast, Clara! Your journey is inspirational and valuable!

 

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FQ Toxicity Featured in The Anxiety Summit

The following post was originally sent out in an email. If you would like to sign up for the Floxie Hope email list, you can do so through THIS LINK. You also get a free copy of the ebook Hacking Fluoroquinolones when you sign up for the email list. 🙂

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Fluoroquinolone-Induced Anxiety

Dear Friends,

As many of you know, fluoroquinolones can induce awful anxiety. There is information about fluoroquinolone-induced anxiety in the following posts:

Fluoroquinolone-induced anxiety can be so horrible, that it can have truly tragic consequences, as described in PSYCHIATRIC ADVERSE REACTIONS TO PHARMACEUTICALS IGNORED. Shea McCarthy lost his life because of his serious and severe psychiatric reaction to Levaquin. It’s horrible, and my heart aches for all of his loved ones.

Anxiety Help and Information

I had the pleasure and honor of being interviewed by my colleague and friend, Food Mood Expert Trudy Scott for “The Anxiety Summit.”  Trudy is the author of The Antianxiety Food Solution: How the Foods You Eat Can Help You Calm Your Anxious Mind, Improve Your Mood and End Cravings and is on a mission to share the amazing healing powers of food and nutrients for anxiety and mood issues.

Between June 6 and June 16, 2016, she will be interviewing world-class experts and opinion leaders on the topic of anxiety and food.

Here are just a few of the amazing speakers and topics:
– “Anxiety: The Stressed and Toxic Gut” – Dr. Josh Axe, DNM, DC, CNS, author of Eat Dirt
– “Multiple sclerosis and anxiety: The Wahls Protocol” – Dr. Terry Wahls, MD, author of The Wahls Protocol
– “Anxiety and digestion: the microbiome, stomach acid, bile and the vagus nerve” – Prof. Liz Lipski, PhD, CCN, CNS, author of Digestive Wellness
– “Marijuana and anxiety: Panacea or Pandora’s Box?” – Dr. Hyla Cass, M.D., board-certified in psychiatry and integrative medicine, author of The Addicted Brain and How to Break Free
– “Anxiety and heavy metals: chelation of mercury and lead” – John Dempster, ND, host of the Mental Wellness Summit
– “Nutrients that Fuel Brain Power and Reduce Anxiety” – Dr. Drew Ramsey, M.D., psychiatrist, farmer, author of Eat Complete

— “Antibiotic Induced Anxiety – How Fluoroquinolone Antibiotics Induce Psychiatric Illness Symptoms” –Lisa Bloomquist of http://www.floxiehope.com

Check out the complete speaker lineup here: THE ANXIETY SUMMIT

You’ll hear the science and learn practical transformational tools you can apply right away.

Once you sign up (at no cost to you!), you will also receive a link to the page where you can download amazing gifts from many of the speakers, and get access to questionnaires and research as they become available.

Here are just a few of the gifts (and more are being added each day):

Top of the World – a custom song co-created by Trudy Scott and Amma Jo
The King’s Medicine Cabinet eBook: A complete guide on essential oils and their history, uses, cures, and recipes that will transform your health forever! By Dr. Josh Axe, author of Eat Dirt
The Leptin Blueprint by Mike Mutzel, author of The Belly Fat Effect
Hacking Fluoroquinolones by Lisa Bloomquist, patient advocate, creator of Floxie Hope
SCD Quick Start Guide by Steve Wright, creator of SCDlifestyle
10 Ways to Balance Serotonin Naturally by Dr. Peter Bongiorno, author of Put Anxiety Behind You
Food for Thought – an audio presentation by Dr. Terry Wahls, MD, author of The Wahls Protocol

You will also have the option to purchase the MP3s and/or transcripts (digital or CD version) of all the interviews if you’d like to keep them for your learning library.
I hope you’ll join the summit!

 

THE ANXIETY SUMMIT is FREE from June 6 – 16, 2016.

 

Thanks to all who join!

 

The Anxiety Summit – Antibiotic Induced Anxiety – How Fluoroquinolone Antibiotics Induce Psychiatric Illness Symptoms

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Serious Psychiatric Reactions from Fluoroquinolones

Heather McCarthy News Story

Please read and share post, “Psychiatric Adverse Reactions to Pharmaceuticals Ignored” that was published on Hormones Matter. It highlights the tragic story of Shea McCarthy, a young man who lost his life after suffering from a severe psychiatric adverse reaction to Levaquin.

The severe psychiatric adverse reactions to fluoroquinolones need to be recognized and acknowledged. No one is choosing to have a severe psychiatric adverse reaction to a drug, yet people with psychiatric adverse reactions are often ignored and disregarded. As you can see from Shea’s tragic story, not listening to people who have psychiatric adverse reactions to drugs can have tragic consequences.

Here is the video of the news story, “CALL 6: Mother blames antibiotic for son’s death – Purdue University student took Levaquin:”

There are several possible mechanisms through which fluoroquinolones can cause anxiety, depression, insomnia, psychosis, and other severe psychiatric adverse-effects. Oxidative stress may be the mechanism through which fluoroquinolones cause severe psychiatric problems, as I described in “Can Antibiotics Induce Psychiatric Reactions?” Maybe gut microbiome destruction by fluoroquinolones leads to the psychiatric adverse effects. The Psychology Today article, “The Gut-Brain Connection, Mental Illness, and Disease” goes over evidence that our gut microbiome is intricately linked to our mental health. Obviously, fluoroquinolones are powerful antibiotics that destroy the gut microbiome. Another possibility, one that I have not previously explored, is that fluoroquinolones cause severe psychiatric reactions because they have a piperazine attachment to the quinolone core. In the picture below, the quinolone core is zone 4 and the piperazine attachment is zone 3.

Cipro Molecular Structure

Ciprofloxacin is 1-cyclopropyl-6-fluoro-1,4-dihydro-4-oxo-7-(1-piperazinyl)-3-quinolinecarboxylic acid.

Piperazine blocks GABA activity. GABA is gamma-Aminobutyric acid, “the chief inhibitory neurotransmitter in the mammalian central nervous system. It plays the principal role in reducing neuronal excitability throughout the nervous system. In humans, GABA is also directly responsible for the regulation of muscle tone.” (wiki) When GABA is blocked, people feel edgy, agitated, excited (not in a good way), anxious, and can suffer from insomnia, muscle spasms, seizures, and more.

Piperazine is often used “for making fake ecstasy because of the similarity in taste, and at certain doses, a user may experience favorable side effects and feel ‘high.’” (source) It is also often mixed with MDMA in ecstasy.

Additionally, it is noted in “Acetylcholine (ACh) – Related Damage” on http://fluoroquinolonethyroid.com/ that:

“Piperazines (anti-parasiticals which kill parasites by paralyzing them) have neuromuscular effects which are thought to be caused by blocking acetylcholine at the myoneural junction. (Plenty of pets have been poisoned with over the counter piperazine toxicity from wormers – so no, it’s not just helminths they affect). Among the numerous properties of Piperazine derivatives, they are not only muscarinic antagonists, but also are the basis for recreational drugs with euphoria and stimulant properties, such as amphetamines, BZP, MDMA [rather, ecstasy, as noted above], and TFMPP, along with all the negative side effects of these drugs (no wonder I was hallucinating during my acute reaction). So now we have a toxic neuromuscular agent with amphetamine/ecstasy-like effects (piperazine), along with a toxic iodine displacer (fluorine), attached to a chemotherapeutic agent with an intracellular, intranuclear, and intra-mitochondrial genotoxic mechanism of action (quinolone) – a synthetic, fluoridated, neurotoxic, genotoxic chemotherapeutic poison masquerading as an antibiotic and being given en masse to the human and animal population.”

Fluoroquinolones “are known to non-competitively inhibit the activity of the neurotransmitter, GABA, thus decreasing the activation threshold needed for that neuron to generate an impulse.” (source, source, source) Fluoroquinolones have also been shown to have similar effects on GABA neurotransmitters as benzodiazepine withdrawal (source).

The inhibition of GABA by the piperazine part of fluoroquinolones is a plausible, even likely, mechanism for the many horrible psychiatric effects that people suffer from after taking fluoroquinolones.

In a survey of 94 people who experienced adverse reactions to Levaquin/levofloxacin, a fluoroquinolone antibiotic, 72% reported experiencing anxiety, 62% reported depression, 48% reported insomnia, 37% reported panic attacks, 33% reported brain fog and/or cognitive impairment, 29% reported depersonalization and/or derealization, 24% reported thoughts of suicide and 22% reported psychosis. (source, source)

More than 20 million prescriptions for fluoroquinolones are given out in the U.S. each year. If even only 1% of the people who take fluoroquinolones experience a psychiatric adverse-reaction, that’s still a lot of people whose minds aren’t their own, who are suffering from depression, anxiety, insomnia and worse, because of an antibiotic that is made with a chemical that has amphetamine/ecstasy-like effects.

These effects can have tragic consequences, as can be seen in the video and article mentioned above about Shea McCarthy.

Psychiatric adverse effects of prescription drugs are serious, and they should be taken seriously. They are not a choice. No one would choose to feel psychotic, or even anxious.

There are many plausible mechanisms through which fluoroquinolones can cause psychiatric problems. Perhaps it is time that the psychiatric effects of fluoroquinolones become more widely recognized.

 

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Treating Fluoroquinolone Anxiety

Free-floating, often severe, anxiety is a common symptom of fluoroquinolone toxicity.

Fluoroquinolones thoroughly mess up GABA neurotransmitters, and GABA “plays the principal role in reducing neuronal excitability throughout the nervous system.”  Here are a few articles that describe how fluoroquinolones negatively affect GABA – Article 1, Article 2, Article 3.

To put what fluoroquinolones do to GABA neurotransmitters into a framework, they basically throw people into protracted benzodiazepine withdrawal.  People who have gone through benzodiazepine withdrawal at any time in life should NEVER take a fluoroquinolone.  See “Benzodiazepine tolerance, dependency, and withdrawal syndromes and interactions with fluoroquinolone antimicrobials” for more information about how fluoroquinolones affect people who have a history of benzodiazepine use and withdrawal.

The things that help people through protracted benzodiazepine withdrawal may be helpful for floxies too.  GABA neurotransmitters and receptors have been iatrogenically damaged by both drugs, and they need to heal.  From what I understand, the Ashton Manual has a lot of good information in it about healing from benzodiazepine withdrawal.  Support sites like www.benzobuddies.org may also be helpful.

A very interesting review of supplements to treat anxiety (specifically benzodiazepine induced anxiety, but the advice is applicable to floxies too) can be found through this link –

http://www.longecity.org/forum/topic/54028-treating-anxiety-safely-effectively/

Additionally, Ruth has researched and written extensively about fluoroquinolone induced anxiety and I suggest reading her story – https://floxiehope.com/ruths-story-cipro-toxicity/ and listening to her podcast – https://floxiehope.com/2015/01/07/the-floxie-hope-podcast-episode-6-ruth-young/.  She also wrote some very interesting and insightful comments on my story starting about June 9, 2015 – https://floxiehope.com/lisas-recovery-story-cipro-toxicity/comment-page-13/#comments.

Ruth mentions supplementing uridine in her story:

I also have found that uridine works really well when I get that horrible insomnia and nothing else is helping. Uridine has it’s own receptors in the brain, so maybe it is a way floxies can bypass GABA receptor damage. I cannot prevent a relapse with it. I take it after the relapse starts, 500-750 mg with a fish oil capsule to help it work better. It’s something to have in reserve for those times you just want to crawl out of your own skin and you need to get some rest. Taking it every day did nothing for me. It has to be timed just right, at the moment that every time I’m starting to fall asleep symptoms are getting more intense and now I’m standing there by my bed with my skin just burning, knowing I am not going to sleep. A couple uridine and I’m out within thirty minutes.

It has recently come to my attention that uridine helps to reduce epileptic seizures and that increases free GABA, thus it has a calming influence. I have found it to be useful.

The things that helped me to get through cipro-induced anxiety are: 1. Acupuncture, 2. Meditation, 3. Stress reduction – especially flox related stress – that meant getting off the internet.

I went through a recent period of pain that induced anxiety. Kava helped me a lot. The longecity article recommends against kava, and I think that their concerns are valid. It is only for short-term use and it probably isn’t best for people who have had a history of benzo withdrawal. Personally, I’ve never had a benzo and I only needed to use kava for a short period of time.  It was a life-saver during the time I used it. Be careful with it though.

There is a vicious cycle when it comes to fluoroquinolone toxicity symptoms and anxiety.  Fluoroquinolone toxicity symptoms lead to stress and anxiety (it’s a pretty reasonable to be stressed and anxious when you’re suddenly in pain, you can’t move but when you do you tear tendons, you lose your memory, and suffer from chronic insomnia – to name just a few symptoms of fluoroquinolone toxicity), stress and anxiety negatively affect the autonomic nervous system (ANS) and lead to dysautonomia, ANS damage leads to more fluoroquinolone toxicity symptoms, which leads to more stress, and so on, and so on.

I don’t think that fluoroquinolone toxicity is “just” anxiety, but I do think that anxiety makes every symptom of fluoroquinolone toxicity worse.  I also think that there is nothing to be trivialized about anxiety.  It’s not a choice.  It’s the central and autonomic nervous systems going completely hay-wire, and both stress and anxiety can lead to serious health problems.

I know that anxiety makes you not want to do these things, but I also suggest trying really hard to do the simple things that make you healthy and happy. Sleep plenty. Enjoy your food. Laugh a lot. Be social. Hang out with a pet and/or children. Those things are healthy and they are healing. They’re easier said than done, but they’re certainly worth a try.

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In my opinion, it’s imperative for floxies to get stress and anxiety symptoms under control.  Neither stress nor anxiety are easy things to control, and, like I said earlier, it’s not a choice – it’s GABA neurotransmitter damage – but anything that can be done to reduce stress and anxiety will help the GABA neurotransmitters to heal, and will help the ANS and CNS to normalize.

Fluoroquinolone induced anxiety can be crawl-out-of-your-skin horrible, but it does get better.  Hang in there, my friends.

 

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The Floxie Hope Podcast Episode 12 – Elise

Elise Floxie Hope Podcast

 

I had the pleasure of interviewing Elise for Episode 12 of The Floxie Hope Podcast.

Elise shares a lot of valuable information in her podcast.  She goes over her long journey of fluoroquinolone toxicity, and things that she has done to heal, in the podcast.

You can listen to the podcast through these links –

http://www.floxiehopepodcast.com/episode-012-elise/

https://itunes.apple.com/us/podcast/floxie-hope-podcast/id945226010

Elise has generously offered to help anyone who wants to reach out to her –

Elise’s facebook info: https://www.facebook.com/elise.child.5

Email: elisedchild@gmail.com

In the podcast, Elise mentions that her naturopathic doctor, Dr. Cynthia Buxton, has helped her immensely.  Dr. Buxton can be found through this link – http://naturalhealthcarenw.com/?p=346

Elise was also helped by eating for her blood type.  Information about that can be found here – http://www.4yourtype.com/

The TQI diet also helped Elise – http://toquietinflammation.com/

Univera Xtra also helped Elise – https://www.newunivera.com/en-us/search?Text=xtra&Area=Products

Elise also found Cleansing/gut health options to be helpful: https://humaworm.com/, http://www.renewlife.com/herbal-cleansing/paragone.html

Liver support: Elise currently takes a tincture with milk thistle, dandelion, etc.

Elise noted, “I forgot to mention the value of amino acid therapy in my own healing, which can be extremely helpful with depression, anxiety, insomnia, getting off of antidepressants, etc. I feel it is very important to do this with one’s doctor for dosage, length of use and quality of supplements. Amino Acid Therapy Info: (some examples, lots of info out there) http://www.neurogistics.com/thescience/aminoacids.asp, http://www.antianxietyfoodsolution.com/wp/wp-content/uploads/2014/11/Anxiety-mood-emotional-eating-sugar-cravings-mood-quiz-by-Trudy-ScottV2.pdf

If you have any questions about any of these products, please contact Elise.

Thank you for listening to The Floxie Hope Podcast!  Stay hopeful, friends!

 

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