Tag Archives: Avelox

Fluoroquinolone Antibiotics Associated with Carpal Tunnel Syndrome

It is well-known and well-documented that fluoroquinolones weaken and destroy musculoskeletal tissues–especially, but not limited to, tendons. 

Additionally, it is known that fluoroquinolones cause neurological problems, and can lead to painful and debilitating peripheral neuropathy. (In 2013, fluoroquinolone warning labels were updated to note that Cipro/ciprofloxacin, Levaquin/levofloxacin, Avelox/moxifloxacin, and Floxin/ofloxacin can cause permanent and disabling peripheral neuropathy.)

Given that fluoroquinolones disproportionately affect the tissues in joints, and that they also adversely affect nerves (causing painful neuropathy), it’s not surprising that fluoroquinolone antibiotic use is associated with Carpal Tunnel Syndrome (CTS)–a medical condition that includes “pain, numbness, and tingling, in the thumb, index finger, middle finger, and the thumb side of the ring fingers,” as well as weakness and muscle wasting.

Both CTS and fluoroquinolone-use are common in America, and researchers Jasmine Z. Cheng, Mohit Sodhi, Mahyar Etminan, and Bruce C. Carleton, examined how they are related in “Fluoroquinolone Use and Risk of Carpal Tunnel Syndrome: A Pharmacoepidemiologic Study” published in the journal Clinical Infectious Diseases in August, 2017.

In “Fluoroquinolone Use and Risk of Carpal Tunnel Syndrome: A Pharmacoepidemiologic Study” the researchers found that, “Any use of FQ within the year prior to CTS diagnosis was associated with a 34% and 36% increased risk of CTS in the primary and sensitivity analyses, respectively” and that:

“The results of our study are consistent with an increase in the risk of CTS with FQs. The risk was consistent among all risk periods with a slight increase among past users, which may be due to the longer period elapsed for CTS to manifest itself. FQ-related neurotoxicity can persist cumulatively in relation to exposure levels [8, 9]. The exact mechanism by which this occurs is unknown [9], but proposed models include direct nerve inflammation and ischemia from toxic metabolite and free radical formation [10], and FQ-induced tendonitis/tendinopathy causing mechanical compression upon the adjacent nerves (eg, median nerve) that share the carpal tunnel [11]. Reports of nerve biopsy studies on patients who have experienced FQ adverse events have revealed significantly reduced nerve fiber density consistent with small fiber neuropathy, which may be a potential mechanism of CTS [12]. Although neurotoxicity is the second most commonly reported adverse event, with several studies documenting FQ association with central and peripheral nerve damage [8, 9], this is the first large-scale study exploring the relationship between FQs and CTS.”

CTS is a malady that affects thousands of people and has societal costs in the millions of dollars. In “Fluoroquinolone Use and Risk of Carpal Tunnel Syndrome: A Pharmacoepidemiologic Study” the researchers note that:

“CTS is a disease of significant societal burden with a prevalence of 5% and incidence of up to 2.3 per 1000 person-years [4, 5]. CTS causes loss of function and decreased quality of life for individual patients, and also comprises a large cumulative drain on healthcare and socioeconomic resources from loss of productivity and worker’s compensation claims [6]. One study of 4443 CTS claimants in Washington State estimated a cumulative socioeconomic cost of US$197–$382 million over 6 years for this cohort alone [6].”

Fluoroquinolones are increasing the risk of CTS in millions of people (20+ million prescriptions for fluoroquinolones are written each year). Are doctors or patients aware that they are increasing the patient’s chances of CTS–a painful, debilitating, and costly condition–when fluoroquinolone antibiotics are taken? I doubt it, but they should be.

Please spread the word about how dangerous fluoroquinolones are by sharing posts, news articles, and research articles that connect fluoroquinolones with other illnesses. It wouldn’t occur to most people that a commonly prescribed class of antibiotics could be connected with CTS, psychiatric illness, pain, pseudotumor cerebri, tendon damage and ruptures, or multi-symptom chronic illnesses. But fluoroquinolones ARE connected with those, and other, diseases and syndromes. Articles like “Fluoroquinolone Use and Risk of Carpal Tunnel Syndrome: A Pharmacoepidemiologic Study” help to provide evidence of the extensive damage that fluoroquinolones do, and I am grateful to the researchers who examined the connections. Please spread the word so that doctors and patients alike are informed. Thank you.

 

 

Do Fluoroquinolones Cause Cerebrospinal Fluid Leaks?

It is well known that fluoroquinolone antibiotics (Cipro/ciprofloxacin, Levaquin/levofloxacin, Avelox/moxifloxacin, Floxin/ofloxacin, and a few others) damage connective tissues–including musculoskeletal connective tissues like tendons, cartilage, bone, and muscle, as well as other connective tissues such as ocular tissue (including the retina), eardrums, and cardiac/heart tissue. Multiple studies have found that fluoroquinolones are toxic and damaging to connective tissues. Given the wide differences in tissues that fluoroquinolones have been shown to deleteriously affect–from cartilage to cardiac/heart tissue–it is reasonable to assert that they damage all connective tissues throughout the body. (Read any of the articles in the citations listed below for information about how fluoroquinolones damage connective tissues.)

Given that fluoroquinolones damage connective tissues (probably all connective tissues), I have a new, developing, hypothesis for how fluoroquinolones lead to fluoroquinolone toxicity syndrome/fluoroquinolone associated disability (FQAD). Please keep in mind that this is one of many hypotheses, and it is just one among about a dozen possibilities (you can read about some of the other possibilities on the post What is Fluoroquinolone Toxicity, or through the free ebook Hacking Fluoroquinolones.)

Hypothesis:

Fluoroquinolones damage the dura (dura mater)–the layer of connective tissue that surrounds the brain and spinal cord and keeps spinal fluid around those vital organs. This leads to spinal fluid leakage, which leads to many symptoms of fluoroquinolone toxicity, including:

  • Headaches (Including chronic migraines)
  • Autonomic nervous system dysfunction including POTS (postural orthostatic tachycardia syndrome) symptoms
  • Nausea and/or vomiting
  • Ringing in the ears (tinnitus) and hearing changes
  • Neck pain and stiffness
  • Radicular pain
  • Memory and cognitive problems (and other “neurolgic weirdness”)
  • Fatigue
  • Tachycardia (Racing heart/heart palpitations)
  • Dizziness (especially upon standing)

This wonderful lecture by Dr. Ian Carroll describes how cerebrospinal fluid leaks can lead to symptoms of many illnesses, including “mysterious” diseases like POTS, ME/CFS, fibromyalgia, as well as heart palpitations and severe headaches.

I suggest that you watch the entire video, as well as Dr. Carroll’s other videos on youtube. Here are some notes/highlights from the video above:

  • Many symptoms of POTS are actually cerebrospinal fluid leaks
  • The spinal cord is surrounded by tissue called the dura, and the dura holds cerebrospinal fluid around the spinal cord and brain. It’s like a water-tight bag that holds in cerebrospinal fluid and maintains pressure.
  • What causes people to have cerebrospinal fluid leaks?
    • Messed up connective tissue
      • From connective tissue disorders like ehlers danlos syndrome
      • (From fluoroquinolones???)
    • Something calcified and boney sticking into the dura
      • Bulging discs
    • Iatrogenic damage
      • Lumbar punctures
      • Epidurals
      • Back surgery
    • Car accidents (and other types of jarring, high-speed accidents)
      • Whiplash
  • How do you know if you have messed up connective tissue?
  • Calcium spikes sticking into the dura are difficult to detect via MRI, but they are clearer with a ct myelogram.
  • “Neurologic weirdness” is a sign of cerebrospinal fluid leaks. If someone is more confused later in the day, that can be an example of neurologic weirdness that results from a leak.
  • Cerebrospinal fluid leaks are misunderstood and under-recognized.
    • Post-puncture cerebrospinal fluid leaks are recognized.
    • Longer term cerebrospinal fluid leaks are less recognized and they present differently.
  • Post Dural Puncture Headache (PDPH) vs. Spontaneous Leak
    • Post Dural Puncture Headache (PDPH)
      • Single leak, orthostatic headache, 90% response to single EBP, Natural history understood and mostly benign, rarely mysterious, young women most at risk, fixable.
    • Spontaneous Leak
      • 30-40% multisite leak, late day headache, exertional headache, non-orthostatic CDH, 30% response to single EBP, natural history poorly understood and marked by chronic disability, often mysterious, HDCT, fixable.
  • There are people out there who have cerebrospinal fluid leaks that aren’t being recognized. Many people with cerebrospinal fluid leaks are misdiagnosed. Cerebrospinal fluid leaks are fixable and it is a shame that they aren’t all being recognized.
    • Cerebrospinal fluid leaks are NOT RARE.
  • Symptoms of cerebrospinal fluid leaks:
    • Headache, nausea and/or vomiting, ringing in the ears and hearing changes, neck pain and stiffness, radicular pain, neurological weirdness, fatigue
  • The effects of cerebrospinal fluid leaks on the pituitary gland
    • The pituitary gland is enlarged (How does this affect hormones???)
    • The connection between the pituitary gland and the brain can be disturbed, and this can lead to hormonal disruptions. High prolactin is an indicator of this problem.
  • Cerebrospinal fluid leaks can cause sagging of other parts of the brain.
  • MRIs of people suffering from cerebrospinal fluid leaks often appear normal. They are subtle and most doctors aren’t trained to see them.
  • Treatment of cerebrospinal fluid leaks
    • Epidural blood patches (Dr. Carroll describes how they’re done)
  • Cerebrospinal fluid leaks are NOT RARE, they’re just misdiagnosed and under-recognized

Before I watched Dr. Carroll’s lecture, I knew that cerebrospinal fluid leaks were painful and debilitating, but I didn’t realize that they were connected to “mysterious” disease symptoms or autonomic nervous system damage.

Connecting cerebrospinal fluid leaks to fatigue, a racing heart, blood pressure and blood sugar irregularities, tinnitus, cognitive and memory problems, hormonal abnormalities, etc. establishes a plausible connection between the (well-established) connective tissue damage done by fluoroquinolones, and the array of chronic, mysterious, disease symptoms that people with fluoroquinolone toxicity suffer from. Perhaps fluoroquinolones cause an array of debilitating chronic, mysterious illness symptoms through damaging the dura and allowing cerebrospinal fluid to leak–which leads to multiple symptoms of fluoroquinolone toxicity (and other chronic illnesses). It certainly seems like a plausible hypothesis to me. It actually seems like an easier hypothesis to postulate and prove than many of the other hypotheses regarding fluoroquinolone toxicity that have been put forth. As I noted above, the damage that fluoroquinolones do to connective tissues is well-established and recognized, and if someone looked at the effects of fluoroquinolones on dura mater tissue specifically, this hypothesis would be easily testable.

Some additional evidence supporting the possible connection between fluoroquinolones and cerebrospinal fluid leaks comes from the large number of people in cerebrospinal fluid leak support groups that have taken fluoroquinolones in the past who assert that fluoroquinolones contributed to their cerebrospinal fluid leak. I know that asking people in facebook support groups doesn’t count as a scientific study, but (to the best of my knowledge) no scientific studies of the link between fluoroquinolone use and cerebrospinal fluid leaks has been done, and the testimonials of the people who have cerebrospinal fluid leaks are important–they point both researchers and fellow patients toward research that may provide answers.

I also find it to be interesting that cerebrospinal fluid leaks affect the pituitary gland, which affects hormone production and regulation. Many people with fluoroquinolone toxicity syndrome have hormonal problems–from tanked testosterone to thyroid abnormalities. Maybe fluoroquinolones cause damaged dura tissue, which causes cerebrospinal fluid leaks, which causes pituitary gland structural abnormalities, which causes hormonal dysregulation, which causes multi-symptom chronic illness symptoms.

Dr. Carroll’s hypotheses and observations are fascinating and exciting for those who are dealing with fluoroquinolone toxicity and other multi-symptom, chronic, mysterious illnesses. I hope that they are explored further. Dr. Carroll’s results with patients are incredibly promising, exciting, and hopeful for people who are suffering from multi-symptom, chronic, mysterious illnesses–including those suffering from fluoroquinolone toxicity. I hope that Dr. Carroll, or other clinicians or researchers, look into the connections between fluoroquinolones and chronic cerebrospinal fluid leaks. It’s possible that the connections could lead to a comprehensive theory of fluoroquinolone toxicity, and may also lead to breakthroughs in other chronic illnesses.

Citations:

Musculoskeletal Complications of Fluoroquinolones: Guidelines and Precautions for Usage in the Athletic Population. Hall, Mederic M. et al. PM&R , Volume 3 , Issue 2 , 132 – 142

Etminan M, Forooghian F, Brophy JM, Bird ST, Maberley D. Oral Fluoroquinolones and the Risk of Retinal Detachment. JAMA. 2012;307(13):1414-1419. doi:10.1001/jama.2012.383

Lee C, Lee MG, Chen Y, Lee S, Chen Y, Chen S, Chang S. Risk of Aortic Dissection and Aortic Aneurysm in Patients Taking Oral Fluoroquinolone. JAMA Intern Med. 2015;175(11):1839-1847. doi:10.1001/jamainternmed.2015.5389

Adel Alrwisan, Patrick J. Antonelli, Almut G. Winterstein; Quinolone Ear Drops After Tympanostomy Tubes and the Risk of Eardrum Perforation: A Retrospective Cohort Study. Clin Infect Dis 2017; 64 (8): 1052-1058. doi: 10.1093/cid/cix032

 

Consumer Reports Warns Patients About Fluoroquinolone Dangers

consumer-reports-0816

Consumer Reports has published several articles about the dangers of fluoroquinolone antibiotics (including Cipro/ciprofloxacin, Levaquin/levofloxacin, Avelox/moxifloxacin, Floxin/ofloxacin, and a few others). Their help in getting the word out to their readers about the risks associated with fluoroquinolone antibiotics is greatly appreciated!

The picture above, from the August, 2016 print issue of Consumer Reports, states:

These potent antibiotics are often prescribed to treat bronchitis, sinus infections, and urinary tract infections. But drugs such as ciprofloxacin (Cipro), levofloxacin (Levaquin), and ofloxacin (Floxin) can cause irregular heartbeats, depression, nerve damage, ruptured tendons, seizures, and other serious side effects. The Food and Drug Administration issued an alert in May saying that fluoroquinolones should not be used to treat bronchitis, sinus infections, and UTIs, unless other options have not worked.

Avoid Problems. If your doctor suggests a fluoroquinolone, ask why. For sinus infections, you might need an antibiotic if your symptoms last more than a week or if you have a high fever, but the first option should be amoxicillin. For a UTI, fluoroquinolones are only necessary if the infection is resistant to other antibiotics or has spread to your kidneys. And they are necessary for chronic bronchitis only if you require hospitalization.

In Fluoroquinolones Are Too Risky for Common Infections: The FDA advises restricting use of popular antibiotics such as Cipro due to dangerous side effects, Consumer Reports notes that the FDA “is advising against prescribing fluoroquinolones, a group of antibiotics that includes drugs such as Cipro and Levaquin, to treat three common illnesses —bronchitis, sinus infections, and urinary tract infections.” The article also quotes Rachel Brummert, the Executive Director of the Quinolone Vigilance Foundation, and notes that her injuries from Levaquin include tendon ruptures and progressive nerve damage. The article also gives a guide of when to say no to fluoroquinolones. It’s an excellent article–please share it far and wide.

In Make Sure Your Doctor Prescribes the Right Antibiotic: There are safer, better options than fluoroquinolones and other frequently prescribed broad-spectrum drugs, the severe effects of fluoroquinolones are noted:

“For example, fluoroquinolone antibiotics such as ciprofloxacin (Cipro and generic) and levofloxacin (Levaquin and generic)—which are frequently prescribed inappropriately for sinus infections in adults—can cause permanent and debilitating damage to muscles, tendons, and nerves.”

As the title of the article says, there are safer, better options than fluoroquinolones (in many situations).

In Surprising Remedy for Deadly Hospital Infections: New study suggests doctors cut back on antibiotics. Here’s what you need to know. it is noted that fluoroquinolone use can lead to c. diff infections:

“Research published in The Lancet, a British medical journal, shows that when doctors in U.K. hospitals cut back on prescribing Cipro, Levaquin, and other so-called fluoroquinolone antibiotics, the rate of deadly infections from the bacteria known as C. diff dropped a whopping 80 percent.”

Fluoroquinolones wipe out the good bacteria that keep c. diff bacteria suppressed. When those good bacteria are eliminated, c. diff infections can take over. C. diff infections can be deadly, and all healthcare professionals should take note of this (somewhat counterintuitive) study.

All of the articles linked to above also note that fluoroquinolone over-use is contributing to antibiotic resistance.

In Meds That Cause Blurred Vision, Hearing Loss, and More: Painkillers, antibiotics, and other common drugs can trigger surprising side effects Cipro is listed as a drug that can cause double vision.

In I Didn’t Know That Antibiotics Shouldn’t Always be Used to Treat Bronchitis, Mary H. describes how Levaquin (prescribed to treat bronchitis) led to Stevens-Johnson Syndrome, which can be deadly.

All of these Consumer Reports articles are greatly appreciated, and I encourage you to read them, comment on them (where possible), and share them with your loved ones.

Consumer Reports has been a trusted source of information, and a strong advocate for consumer protection, since its founding in 1936. The articles linked-to above are from a highly respected source that is trusted by millions of people. It is a credible publication.

For a trusted and credible publication like Consumer Reports to be publishing information about the severe and varied health maladies that are associated with flouroquinolones is a huge step in the right direction. Their acknowledgement of the FDA’s updated warnings on fluoroquinolones, as well as the testimony of patients who have been hurt by fluoroquinolones, is appreciated immensely.

Thank you, Consumer Reports! Please keep it up, and hopefully other trusted news and consumer advocacy publications will follow suit.

 

 

Floxie Hope Podcast Episode 19 – Ian

ian1

I had the pleasure and honor of interviewing Ian for Episode 19 of The Floxie Hope Podcast.

Check it out!

http://www.floxiehopepodcast.com/episode-019-ian/

https://itunes.apple.com/us/podcast/floxie-hope-podcast/id945226010

Ian was an Olympic athlete prior to getting “floxed” by Levaquin. He has experienced severe fluoroquinolone toxicity symptoms, including multiple tendon tears that put an end to his cross-country ski racing career. Athletes should NEVER take fluoroquinolones. Ian went from being in the 2002 Olympics, to barely being able to walk around the block. If it can happen to him, it can happen to anyone. Please warn all your loved athletes so that they never take these dangerous, disabling antibiotics.

Ian is incredibly wise and insightful. His advice about how to face fluoroquinolone toxicity emotionally, mentally, socially, and psychologically is incredibly valuable. Please take the time to listen to him, and consider sharing this podcast with friends, family, and other loved ones. Ian’s measured and thoughtful voice of wisdom will help them to understand fluoroquinolone toxicity.

One thing that has recently helped Ian is KT tape. He posted this:

ian2kt

I had to let my body cure itself for 8 years, but then this KT and cloth tape job along with compromising my technique is what is enabling me to ski. I use about $25 worth of tape per week! I do this tape job on both legs every time I go out. I am very grateful to be able to ski some again!

Thank you all for listening!

I apologize for the poor sound quality. My voice echoes at the beginning of the podcast. Feel free to skip what I say – it’s not near as important as what Ian says. 🙂

 

flu tox get help you need banner click lisa

The Gaslighting of Patients

Gaslighting: A form of manipulation that seeks to sow seeds of doubt in a targeted individual or members of a group, hoping to make targets question their own memory, perception, and sanity. Using persistent denial, misdirection, contradiction, and lying, it attempts to destabilize the target and delegitimize the target’s belief.

Gaslighting occurs far too often to patients who experience adverse reactions to pharmaceuticals. Often, it is done by the people patients turn to when they are sick–our trusted advisors, our healers: our doctors.

I don’t think that most doctors mean to gaslight their patients, or that many of them are narcissists or abusers who intentionally manipulate people. I think that most doctors want to heal and help their patients. They use the information and tools that they have to move their patients toward health and well-being.

Yet, gaslighting is occurring.

When “floxed” patients approach their doctors with symptoms of fluoroquinolone toxicity (or FQAD-fluoroquinolone associated disability) they often face denial, derision, and hostility from the doctors who they are requesting help from. The doctors say that the symptoms that the patient is experiencing can’t be from the Cipro (ciprofloxacin), Levaquin (levofloxacin), Avelox (moxifloxacin), or Floxin (ofloxacin), even though most of the symptoms of fluoroquinolone toxicity / FQAD are listed in the 40+ page warning labels. They say that the drugs should be out of the patient’s body, even though the black box warning label notes that fluoroquinolones “have been associated with disabling and potentially irreversible serious adverse reactions.” They say that they’ve never seen a patient who has had an adverse reaction to a fluoroquinolone–and that may be true, but are they looking? They say that delayed reactions can’t happen–but they’re documented. They deny that adverse reactions can happen, probably because they are in denial about the very real possibility that the drugs that they prescribe can cause serious, severe, and irreversible pain to their patients.

Then, they suggest that the patient see a psychiatrist and get on antidepressants.

Some people who experience adverse reactions to fluoroquinolones benefit from seeing a psychiatrist and taking antidepressants (though others are hurt further by both–be careful), and those things aren’t inherently bad, but the implication in suggesting psychiatrists or antidepressants is that patients who are experiencing adverse reactions to fluoroquinolones are crazy. We’re not crazy. Though some fluoroquinolone toxicity / FQAD symptoms are psychiatric, none of the symptoms, not even the psychiatric ones, are choices, decisions, or even the result of being crazy. All the symptoms of fluoroquiolone toxicity / FQAD stem from fluoroquinolone use and the damage done by these drugs.

fluoroquinolone-lawsuit-banner-trulaw

When a person, especially a doctor, suggests that all the symptoms of fluoroquinolone toxicity / FQAD are in a patient’s head, they are gaslighting the patient and making him or her feel crazy.

It’s dismissive, it’s obnoxious, sometimes it’s abusive, and it’s always wrong.

It happens all the time though, and I wish that it would stop.

Adverse reactions to fluoroquinolones (and other pharmaceuticals) are real, and they happen more often than they should. Denying that adverse reactions occur, then blaming the victim and telling him/her that he/she is insane, is not only useless, it is destructive. It hurts the patient/doctor relationship, and, more importantly, it hurts the patient. As I said above, I don’t think that many doctors intentionally seek to manipulate or hurt their patients. It’s happening though, and it needs to stop.

In the stories of patient pain and suffering from fluoroquinolones described on Fluoroquinolone Stories and The Fluoroquinolone Wall of Pain, doctor denial and gaslighting are described.

Sherry describes the gaslighting and denial that she experienced after taking Floxin and Flagyl:

“I went from doctor to doctor trying to convince them that these drugs did this to my body. They looked at me as if I had ten heads. They couldn’t believe that these medications could stay in one’s body for that long. I was crazy. I would bring them papers to show them proof and one doctor said to me that the medical community would use these papers for toilet paper!”

Cheryl notes the following experience after taking Ciprofloxacin XL:

“I went back to the pharmacist and told him the reaction I had. He said it can happen and it certainly sounded like I had an adverse reaction but he did not report it. I went back to the doctor how prescribed the drug to me and he did not believe me that I had reacted in that manner. Again, no reporting back to any authorities that I had an adverse reaction. I tried to show him the evidence of how many people have been damaged by this group of drugs and how dangerous they are and I was blown off. He told me he prescribes this drug all the time and has never had anyone react. I beg to differ because I bet people do have negative reactions but because they happen after the drug has been used, the connection between the aching muscles, nausea, anxiety, stiffness etc are not connected to the drug they took a month or more ago.”

There are many others.

Floxies are not alone in getting gaslighted by doctors. In the post “The Unintentional Gaslighting of Women and a Goodbye” Kerry Gretchen describes how her stroke that resulted from hormonal birth control wasn’t taken seriously by the doctors who treated her. Support groups for people who have had adverse reactions to a variety of pharmaceuticals and medical devices are full of patients who are frustrated and hurt when their doctor denies both their pain, and the cause of it.

The pain caused by pharmaceutical injuries is real, and patient pain should never be dismissed or denied. When denial of pain occurs, and patients are told that their symptoms are all in their head, it hurts the patient psychologically, and destroys the trust and bond between the patient and his or her doctor.

Doctors can stop this cycle through listening to their patients, not dismissing or disregarding adverse drug reactions as “rare” or “all in your head,” and being conscious of gaslighting as a phenomenon. Good, thoughtful, kind doctors don’t want to hurt or manipulate their patients, but, in order to maintain their worldview about the safety and efficacy of the drugs they prescribe, they often deny and deflect. Hopefully, with awareness of both gaslighting as a phenomenon, and how adverse drug reaction symptoms appear, the cycle will be halted.

 

flu tox get help you need banner click lisa

 

 

New Fluoroquinolones in the Pipeline

The most commonly prescribed fluoroquinolones are Cipro/ciprofloxacin, Levaquin/levofloxacin, Avelox/moxifloxacin, and Floxin/ofloxacin. Almost every “floxie” that has been poisoned by fluoroquinolones in the last 15 years has taken Cipro/ciprofloxacin, Levaquin/levofloxacin, Avelox/moxifloxacin, or Floxin/ofloxacin. However, there are many other quinolones and fluoroquinolones that have been developed. Here is a list:

First-generation:

Second-generation:

  • ciprofloxacin (Cipro) -Still on the market. Millions of prescriptions dispensed annually worldwide. 
  • enoxacin (Enroxil, Penetrex) – withdrawn from the market
  • fleroxacin (Megalone, Roquinol) – withdrawn from the market
  • lomefloxacin (Maxaquin)  – withdrawn from the market
  • nadifloxacin (Acuatim, Nadoxin, Nadixa)  – withdrawn from the market
  • norfloxacin (Lexinor, Noroxin, Quinabic, Janacin)  – withdrawn from the market
  • ofloxacin (Floxin, Oxaldin, Tarivid) – Still on the market. Millions of prescriptions dispensed annually worldwide. 
  • pefloxacin (Peflacine) – withdrawn from the market
  • rufloxacin (Uroflox) – withdrawn from the market

Third-generation:

  • balofloxacin (Baloxin) – withdrawn from the market
  • grepafloxacin (Raxar) – withdrawn from the market
  • levofloxacin (Leflox, Cravit, Levaquin, Tavanic) – Still on the market. Millions of prescriptions dispensed annually worldwide. 
  • pazufloxacin (Pasil, Pazucross) – withdrawn from the market
  • sparfloxacin (Zagam) – withdrawn from the market
  • temafloxacin (Omniflox) – withdrawn from the market
  • tosufloxacin (Ozex, Tosacin) – withdrawn from the market

Fourth-generation:

  • clinafloxacin – Not withdrawn from market, but not commonly available
  • gatifloxacin (Zigat, Tequin) – Tequin removed from the U.S. market, but other forms remain available.
  • gemifloxacin (Factive) – Currently available. More commonly prescribed outside of the U.S.
  • moxifloxacin (Acflox Woodward, Avelox,Vigamox) – Still on the market. Millions of prescriptions dispensed annually worldwide. 
  • sitafloxacin (Gracevit) – withdrawn from the market
  • trovafloxacin (Trovan) – withdrawn from the market
  • prulifloxacin (Quisnon) – withdrawn from the market

Despite the fact that 22 of the 29 quinolones listed above have been removed from the market, and the fact that there is an updated black box warning label (the most serious warning possible on a pharmaceutical), that notes that the fluoroquinolones remaining on the market can cause permanent disability, several pharmaceutical companies are busily developing new fluoroquinolones.

Some of the fluoroquinolones in development include:

  • Delafloxacin (Baxdela) – Delafloxacin/Baxdela is being developed by Melinta Therapeutics, and is currently undergoing Phase III trials. It is supposed to be more effective at treating MRSA and other bacterial infections that are currently resistant to other fluoroquinolones. Melinta says that delafloxacin/Baxdela has a “favorable safety profile,” but, frankly, I don’t believe them. Bayer says that Cipro has an excellent safety profile, but thousands of people have been injured, disabled, and killed by it. Delafloxacin/Baxdela will be effective against gram-positive, gram-negative, atypical and anaerobic bacteria–meaning that it will be a broad-spectrum antibiotic that will kill all microorganisms in its path. I understand that MRSA is a serious, and potentially deadly infection, and that it may be appropriate to use an extra-powerful fluoroquinolone in cases of life-or-death. However, as an extra-strong fluoroquinolone, with an increased scope of bacteria that it kills, it will be a dangerous, and deadly for some, drug. I hope that delafloxacin/Baxdela will be reserved for treating life-threatening MRSA infections, and that it will not be prescribed for treatment of simpler or less dangerous infections.
  • JNJ-2Q – JNJ-2Q is being developed by Furiex Pharmaceuticals, who have licensed JNJ-Q2 from Janssen Pharmaceuticals, a unit of Johnson & Johnson. Like delafloxacin/Baxdela, JNJ-2Q is being developed for the treatment of MRSA, and it is also a particularly strong and potent fluoroquinolone. Again, I hope that it is only used for deadly MRSA infections.
  • Nemonoxacin (Taigexyn) – Nemonoxacin/Taigexyn, developed by TaiGen Biotechnology Company, is currently undergoing phase III trials in the U.S. However, it has already reached the market in Taiwan, Russia, Commonwealth Independent States, Turkey, mainland China, and Latin America. It is also more effective against MRSA than the fluoroquinolones that are currently on the market, and it is more potent than ciprofloxacin, levofloxacin, and moxifloxacin. Not-so-fun-fact – Nemonoxacin has been fast-tracked for approval by the FDA.
  • Zabofloxacin – Zabofloxacin was discovered by Dong Wha Pharmaceuticals and licensed to Pacific Beach BioSciences for development. It is currently undergoing clinical trials. “The spectrum of activity of zabofloxacin includes bacterial strains that are responsible for most community-acquired respiratory infections. Phase III clinical studies are currently ongoing at Dong-Wha for the treatment of patients with acute bacterial exacerbation of chronic obstructive pulmonary disease.” (source)

Be aware that these new fluoroquinolones are in the pipeline. Know their names so that you can avoid them.

I’m not sure how anyone else’s medical record works, but when I asked my doctor to put that I am allergic to fluoroquinolones on my medical record, her computer system wouldn’t allow her to do so. Instead, I had to list all of the fluoroquinolones that I wanted to avoid individually. I suggest that you tell your doctors not only that you can’t have fluoroquinolones, but that you can’t have Cipro/ciprofloxacin, Levaquin/levofloxacin, Avelox/moxifloxacin, and Floxin/ofloxacin specifically. And, when they reach the market, I suggest that you add Baxdela/delafloxacin, JNN-2Q, Taigexyn/nemonoxacin, and zabofloxacin to your list of drugs that you cannot tolerate.

I find the dissonance between the people who review drug safety, and the people that approve new drugs, both of whom are within the FDA, to be a bit mind-boggling. How could the Antimicrobial Drugs Advisory Committee decide that the current warnings on fluoroquinolones are inadequate and that they shouldn’t be prescribed for sinus infections, colitis or UTIs, or chronic bronchitis because they are too dangerous, while another part of the FDA fast-tracks the approval of Taigexyn/nemonoxacin, an even more powerful fluoroquinolone antibiotic? Do they not speak to each other? I can’t fathom that there is not at least some overlap between the Antimicrobial Drugs Advisory Committee and the people who approve new antimicrobial drugs. Are there people at the FDA who are screaming about these new fluoroquinolones that are about to enter the market, and noting that they are horribly unsafe? Or, did the Antimicrobial Drugs Advisory Committee just update the warning labels on existing fluoroquinolones to shut up patient advocates (you and me)? Is there massive cognitive dissonance at the FDA? Because it certainly appears that there is. The people at the FDA, and the Antimicrobial Drugs Advisory Committee specifically, pretend to acknowledge the dangers of fluoroquinolones, and pretend to do something about those dangers, while still thinking that it’s appropriate to approve new, stronger fluoroquinolones for public use. It’s mind-boggling.

There is constant repetition of some mantra along the lines of “fluoroquinolones have an excellent record of safety and efficacy” among drug-makers, drug-regulators, and drug prescribers – despite a massive amount of evidence to the contrary. The list of quinolones/fluoroquinolones above clearly shows that 22 of the 29 drugs have been removed from the market–many because of serious safety concerns. Yet, new, more powerful, fluoroquinolones are entering the market, in part because, for some odd reason, Cipro and Levaquin are seen as “safe.” They’re not safe though. They cause permanent disability and death. The upcoming fluoroquinolones will be worse.

I hope that the new fluoroquinolones that are coming to market are only used to treat life-threatening MRSA infections, but I have no faith that that will be the case. These new fluoroquinolones will be marketed as being bigger/better/faster/more powerful than safer alternatives, doctors will prescribe them, and patients will suffer because of them. Hopefully I’m being too pessimistic, and some prudence will be shown in the prescribing of these dangerous drugs–I doubt that though.

Just be aware of the dangers of fluoroquinolones–both old and new, and protect yourself and your loved ones. Share information about the dangers of fluoroquinolones with your friends and family, and let them know that fluoroquinolones should never be used unless there are no viable alternatives, and the infection is life-threatening. These new fluoroquinolones are more powerful, and more dangerous, than the fluoroquinolones that are currently on the market, and the ones that are on the market are pretty horrible. They should all be avoided like the plague.

 

flu tox get help you need banner click lisa

 

fluoroquinolone-lawsuit-banner-trulaw

Floxie Hope Podcast Episode 17 – Scott

scott-fh-podcast



Scott is featured on Episode 17 of The Floxie Hope Podcast. You can listen to his insightful podcast through either of these links:

or

podcast/id945226010 http://www.floxiehopepodcast.com/episode-017-scott/

You can also download the podcast onto your phone or other device through any podcatcher that connects to iTunes. Thanks for listening!

Please note that this podcast is over two hours long because of some technical difficulties on my (Lisa) part. We recorded the podcast twice, and both recordings are included. The first part of the podcast is actually the second interview. I included it first because the sound quality is better on it. The second half of the podcast is actually the first interview. If you can stand the horrible sound quality (SORRY!), feel free to listen to it first. It starts around the one hour seventeen minute mark. This cartoon reflects the tone of the first (second recorded) part of the podcasts:

preventative-med
The second part of the podcast (first recorded) goes over more of Scott’s journey. Here are some notes from his journey that are helpful. From Scott:
  • One thing I forgot to mention during BOTH podcasts (LOL!) is that when I was in a lot of pain, it turns out that daily meditation helped my mental agony over my situation. It didn’t necessarily make the pain go away (although a few times, it felt like the pain disappeared during the meditation), but it definitely helped me mentally & emotionally deal with my situation much better. I use an app called Headspace, which talks you through daily 10-minute meditations.
  • Myofascial Release was my first glimmer of hope that maybe I could beat this thing. My first myofascial release session with Jody Hendryx of Verde Valley Myofascial Release in Sedona, Arizona was the first time that my pain disappeared in my ankles. I tried about 15 different myofascial therapists before realizing that Jody was the most skilled one that I could find, so I would recommend to people that they shop around to different myofascial therapists if they’re not feeling results.
  • I definitely recommend acupuncture visits and chiropractor visits. For chiropractor visits, The Joint is a nationwide company that I’ve been using with great results.
  • Collagen seems to have helped with some of my snapping tendons, although I still have many tendons that are still snapping. This is the brand of collagen that I take, mixed in with whole-milk yogurt (never fat-free nor low-fat yogurt): Vital Proteins Collagen Peptides
  • I found The Flox Report PDF to be very helpful for me, with a bunch of great hidden tips. The Flox Report does make it clear that not everybody can heal themselves from fluoroquinolone toxicity, but there are charts & tables which help you figure out where you fall on the spectrum of toxicity.
  • A very high-fat diet positively impacted everything for me with my health. I felt dramatic health improvements after starting this way of eating. Specifically, my diet is “high fat, medium protein, low carb, no sugar”. Some excellent books on this topic:
Great high-fat foods: Grass-fed butter, coconut oil, coconut milk (unsweetened), coconut flakes, avocados, guacamole, high-fat cuts of meat, high-fat cheeses (particularly raw cheeses), heavy whipping cream (unsweetened), olive oil, frying in lard/beef tallow/duck fat/ghee, eggs with yolks, sour cream, cream cheese, whole milk yogurt, seeds of all sorts (chia, hemp, sunflower), cacao (nibs/butter/beans), grass-fed & high-fat beef, ribeye steaks, pastured chicken WITH SKIN (that’s where the fat is), fatty bacon, fatty sausage, olives of all types, macadamias & macadamia butter, almonds & almond butter, pecans & pecan butter, walnuts & walnut butter, cashews & cashew butter, baking with almond flour/coconut flour/hazelnut flour/flaxseed meal.
Supplements & powerful foods that have helped me:
For nervous system (brain fog +  peripheral neuropathy):
For energy (chronic fatigue) + mitochondria repair + DNA repair:
For tendons:
For sleep (insomnia) and general health restoration:
Other Resources:
Thanks for listening!
fluoroquinolone-lawsuit-banner-trulaw